.

.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

WEEDS FOR SALE


Many years ago I discovered a weed sale. I was driving down a city street when I noticed quite a few cars parked around this one house.


I quick turned my head as I drove by to see what was going on. A sign saying WEED SALE popped into my view.  I took a turn around at the next intersection and found a parking spot near the action. Folks were pawing over weeds -- gorgeous weeds.


 The various weeds were all sorted out individually as to type into wooden boxes and farm baskets. I was told by a woman pawing that this sale is held once a year in the fall by several women who glean fields for weeds then put on this sale. 


There were a few example arrangements displayed that were put together with the various weeds -- wreaths and a couple stuffed farm baskets. They were so earthy and gorgeous. Their prices for individual weeds were very reasonable. You could pick out the textures and colors you wanted and then take them home to arrange.


When I was in my yard today I noticed that autumn was stalking my fields. Some of the weeds were turning shades of brown, gray and gold. The goldenrod was bright in its lovely golden blooms.


Weeds really are beautiful. Mansanto trys to convince us otherwise. 


My photos are of just of few types of weeds that Mother Nature can provide for us. Above is a tangle of gray that could be bunched and hung on a door or an outbuilding. 

Rose Hips
And if you do decide to go weed hunting perhaps you'll find what I consider a find -- Rose Hips. They can be used in so many ways. Be creative -- gather weeds and use them around your home for the fall season.

17 comments:

  1. How true about the weeds. The ironweed when it is finished blooming and turns brown is still eye catching. Enjoyed the post

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grampy -- I compare the fall weed colors to a beautiful rusticated metal barn roof. All hues of browns, reds, grays, and more show themselves. -- barbara

      Delete
  2. Good pics! I've tried taking photos of weeds...no easy job, but you did great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. turquoisemoon -- I still need lots of improvement of taking photos of weeds. I might still work a bit on the photos in my weeds post and change them out with hopefully a better image? We learn as we go. Challenging with positive rewards. so nice of you to stop by -- barbara

      Delete
  3. Monsanto can't make money off of weeds I guess. Give them time?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rubye -- As soon as a weed as the potential for profit, Mansanto will be on it. Crazy corporate mentality out there in the world. -- barbara

      Delete
  4. I see I have to change my mind about weeds - previously I have just considered them that. You saw beauty where I didn't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RuneE -- Well if anyone can make weeds look beautiful it will be you through your photographs. I have some work to do on catching their essence. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  5. Funny you should mention this. I am a weeder. From little on, I'd bring home weedy stuff. A walk in the woods, or field, can be a scavenger hunt of an all together different kind. I've even dolled up the dull weeds with a hint of spray paint. Nice blog, aroused memories that were put away. Nature Weaver

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nature Weaver -- Nice to hear you are a weeder. There is such beauty in the weeds of our fields. Even in the cracks of our city sidewalks.
      Do you still bring home weeds? I have a friend that collects long stemmed weeds of all different hues and textures and places they in a large crock in front of a fireplace she does not use. It is stunning.
      I hope you have continued to bring home weeds -- barbara

      Delete
    2. Yup, weeds and rocks and leaves and sticks.....they all live with me. I'm going to want weeds with me in the rest home!!! (giggle)

      Delete
  6. Your photos of these graceful plants started thoughts about the American urge toward weedlessness. Control of the terrain? Always get a little chill when entering neighborhoods of manicured lawns, carefully trimmed bushes. In Baltimore a few decades ago, I first saw forsythia cut into roundness. How odd the wish to change the true nature of this lovely plant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. naomi -- Manicured lawns scare me. Usually they contain toxic lawn weed killers. Have you noticed that city and town governments are afraid to let weeds grow along roadsides. Sometimes they used weed cutter mowers to keep the weeds down and sometimes they spray weed killers. I guess to spray is cheaper than to hire someone to rid the roadside of beautiful natural weeds. I guess you would call this action having control of the terrain as you mention in your comment -- thank barbara

      Delete
  7. Well, I've heard it all now. That is an entrepreneur for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Janet -- Yes, actually it was very successful. But of course this was being held in a fairly busy city where fields of weeds were not to be seen. -- barbara

      Delete
  8. Some beautiful weeds! Thanks for telling me about an unusual sale I'd never have imagined. The rose hips are abundant on the beach where I walk, they're large and gorgeous, but it is a conservation area, I'm not supposed to pick. Besides the wild beach rose have almost impenetrable thorny stems. I think I'll just have to look at them and enjoy them in their natural setting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. June -- Wonderful that you have a conservation area along your your beach walk. I once found the large rose hips growing in a waiting-to be-developed field behind a McDonalds. I knew they were doomed. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

      Delete