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Tuesday, September 11, 2012

BEAUTY HIDES IN DARK PLACES


Shade tree

Did you ever think about the the dark places in mother nature's repertoire? Over time,  I have been observing these dark places in nature realizing it contains a world of beauty.



 I define dark places as shadows, stormy skies and the dark of night as palettes for her specialized beauty.


A robin's nest shaded by leaves

I find interesting wild things in shadows. Shadows are everywhere -- perhaps in your yard, or on a walk through the woods, or along a wild roadway, plus more.  These areas hold special beauties such as lichens, mosses, and wildflowers that survive best in shade.


Jewelweed  tiny orchid type wildflowers 
growing along a creek in the shade. (Identified for me by Mamabug's Nature Photos)

When my grass gets taller than I like in the summer, it invites spiders to rest in its grass shadows. When the temps rise I notice flying insects clinging to shady trunks of trees. Birds sequester themselves  under leafy tree branches of mature trees to stay cool. Here in the shadows is where we can find an ample supply of wildness. 


Storm clouds cast dark shadows on the landscape

The dark of night is essential to mother nature.  Last night, around midnight, I had a beautiful experience as I stood on my porch. I had stepped out briefly to let my dog out when I heard the call of an eastern screech owl. It came from a nearby tree. Then another screech owl called  from high up in our thickly wooded  mountains. I stood there listening as the owls took turns calling to each other, their calls  producing a rousing midnight concert. 




A walking stick resting on my window screen in  the darkening night
He is on the outside looking in.

Perhaps we should provide more dark places for nature if we continue to have scalding hot summers. By planting trees, shrubs or grasses we will not only provide a place for wildness to flourish but it would help cool down our climate a bit

15 comments:

  1. Barbara, This is a wonderful post. Doesn't the night open our eyes more? You've helped me to see more fully all that the trees and shrubs around my place are offering. Thank you!

    Great photos.

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  2. Teresa, thanks for the nice comment. Night skies mesmerize me. Once on a camping trip, many years ago, I took out my binoculars and pointed them toward the stars. I wanted to get a closer look at them. To my surprise I discovered that there were layers of stars -- so many more than one could see with the naked eye. That hooked me on watching stars. -- barbara

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  3. What beautiful scenery Barbara! Those beautiful flowers are Jewelweed or Spotted touch-me-not as some folks call them. There is also a beautiful pale yellow variety of Jewelweed too. They love a moist environment.

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    1. Mamabug -- thanks for the ID of my unknown wild flowers. I have heard of Jewelweed but never knew what it looked like. It certainly has delicate blooms that are not portrayed very well in my photo. Loving a moist environment is probably why it likes shade. I will read more on Jewelweed as I find it fascinating. Thanks again -- barbara

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  4. Ok...I'm now on a mission to check out the night...and stars. Hey, have you ever tried taking pics of star trails? (think that's what they're called) That's what I really want to do...

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    1. turquoisemoon -- Since you live in the country, I think, you should catch some wonderful night skies. You are way ahead of me in night photography as my attempts have been minor. Someday I hope to catch the night sky full of stars that I see often from my home ground. I too am taking photo classes -- like going back for a grad degree for me. But I struggle on to learn about F stop etc. Have fun catching your stars -- barbara

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  5. I think the dark spots are often overlooked. We are all so wrapped up in what is happening in the light. A nice post to remind us where we should look.

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    1. Michelle -- I agree with you about the dark places of nature. I did not mention how calming these places can be for humans. Perhaps a swing in the shade from the large tree branch, like in my first photo, could bring stress down to a controllable level for some. -- thanks -- barbara

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  6. Hmmmmm. Now I shall be keeping a better eye out for dark shadowy places. Picture adjectives....the first photo of the tree swing is my fave. Cool.

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  7. Nature Weaver -- When I first saw the shade tree I thought what a great tree for kids to climb. Then I noticed the beautiful shade with the swing placed to take advantage of it. Thanks -- barbara

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  8. Pleased you're back in the hood...appreciate your indirect approach to this difficult anniversary. Looking at photos of survivor families in yesterday's N.Y. Times left me sad and wondering where we will go with future rememberances.

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  9. naomi -- Pleasure being back! Difficult times bringing different responses, introspective in their own personal way -- thanks barbara

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  10. jewelweed. I have that growing in my ditch but had no good name for it. no pretty name. Thank you : ) Jewel weed, of course! I have a big ol' male mulberry tree that gracefully supports 4 children's swings. And a berry producing Mulberry that sports a "porch" swing. I'm blessed; it is awesome! and generates all kinds of comments and plenty of grandchild time with me and my trees.

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    1. Nance -- So many beautiful weeds. A blogger, Mamabug's Nature Photos, told me the name of this lovely weed/wildflower. She often has great photos of wildflowers and other pieces on nature. Your yard must be quite an attraction for your grandchildren -- a way for them to get acquainted with mother nature. -- barbara

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  11. Hi! Great site! I'm trying to find an email address to contact you on to ask if you would please consider adding a link to my website. I'd really appreciate if you could email me back.

    Thanks and have a great day!

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