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Thursday, September 27, 2012

COUNTRY MAIL BOX GATHERING

The Gathering

I enjoy seeing these large group gatherings of old mailboxes along a country road. The gathering above makes me think of people that don't waste things. They put their boxes on old wood logs or cut timbers -- their boxes are worn and some rusted but still do the job they are supposed to do -- receive their mail. Any thoughts on what else this gathering tells us?

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20 comments:

  1. Just a feeling of community, helping with the harvest, a new baby, a barn raising.

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    1. marciamayo -- a cluster such as the boxes in the photo surely does present itself as community. And community is reinforced through verbal news as they meet at the gathering and exchange conversations -- thanks -- barbara

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  2. I am curious if they all live close together on the road, or if their homes are spread apart and these boxes are grouped for the post office, yet providing a quick community for the locals.

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    1. Auntea -- My thoughts are that perhaps they live on a private road near the boxes. I live on a private road (as opposed to a public county road) where the USPS will not home deliver -- uses boxes placed on a public road instead. Just my guess.

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  3. Delightful foto! You know, these days the mailbox brings only junk or bills. I haven't received any real mail (a letter) in years. I often wonder if the mailbox will be a thing of the past???

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    1. turquoisemoon -- I have had thoughts similar to those that you express in your comment. My thoughts are that we will always have some type of postal service but more streamlined -- maybe only handling packages and some types mail? My mail box gets 90 percent of newspaper ads. What a waste that is. thanks -- barbara

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  4. Well, it's probably the USPS requirements, but it appears to be a case of "safety in numbers." A bit of the herd mentality. However, I do love seeing the sense of community it exhibits, also. ;)

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    1. Teresa -- I agree -- these boxes do spell community. Perhaps a community of non-wealth? Wealth seems to support trimmed grass and fancy boxes. Although, neither the trimmed grass or the fancy boxes are important to the world at large.

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  5. If the letter you're expecting is not in your box, check the neighbor's box cause it could very well be in their's. This I know -- having had a box in a group like this at one time.

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    1. Rubye -- That could cause some problems I would think. I have a friend that had letters taken out of her mailbox out by the road -- she found the torn letters lying by her box. I have both a mail box by the road and a P.O. box. I use the P.O. box for bills and bank statements -- the box by the road for non-financial mail. It seems that folks are removing mail in some areas for identify theft use! Then there are wild youth that like to run their old trucks into them. Unfortunate for the owners of the boxes. -- thanks -- barbara

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  6. The song "Little boxes" was about something entirely different, but it just jumped into my mind. Must be easy for the snail that delivers the mail :-)

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    1. RunE -- Not familiar with the song but they certainly are little boxes. Yes, snails do have a reputation of being slow in these parts. thanks for leaving a smile on my face -- barbara

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  7. When I've seen gatherings like this they've seemed friendly and communal. Sometime they're for a trailer park which, as you say, Barbara, has private little roads to which the P.O. will not delivery.

    I'd like to assure Turquoisemoon and others that there are quite a few people who still really like to send and receive "snail mail", I belong to one such and I get quite a few postcards, letters and packages containing, usually. crafty handmade items. This group is an internet group -- yes! -- but they believe in sending mail to one another, it's called Swap-bot. Check it out if you are interested.

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    1. Hi June -- I believe this gathering was in some way related to a private road where the post office does not make deliveries. I too love to receive handwritten letters and cards. Unfortunately they seem to come less often to my mailbox. Emails have taken over the wheel in my opinion. How are we going to gather history of people without handwritten latters. I am going to follow-up on your Swap-bot to see what it is all about. thanks -- barbara

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  8. Taking a ride on a new country road always brings adventures and sites for the camera.

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    1. Birdman -- I agree. My idea of a good day is to venture down an unknown -to-me road and find something interesting and hopefully have my camera with me. -- barbara

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  9. I see a lot of these rows at the ends of some of our county roads. When I see them I think again of how lucky we are to have postal service. E-mail is wonderful but there is nothing like finding a hand-written letter or card from a friend in the mailbox.

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    1. NCmountainwoman - nice to have you back with your blog. I believe that many of us do like a hand written note. I have about 50 letters wrote by a doctor's wife to her daughter about 75 years ago. Each letter is long and full of personal feelings. Will we someday not have letters to tell us about our social and cultural history?

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  10. First thing that came to my mind was "respect for individuality."

    The one, and only, possession that I have that belonged to my Grampa is his mailbox. A large one that stood on a post at the end of his driveway, and his last name is still on it.

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    1. Nature Weaver -- Ohh those old large mailboxes are great. Do you use it? I notice there is a small movement about, to make one's mailbox an individualized personal statement -- thanks -- barbara

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