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Thursday, July 5, 2012

SILVER MAPLE LEAF PATTERN


Silver Maple Leaf under-sides with raindrops

As I sit here I can still hear the last rumblings off in the distance of the banging thunder storm that just went through my area. I am a thunder storm nut and revel in all the lightning , thunder, and pouring rain. Unfortunately my big brave Sal dog gets nervous with each clap and sticks to me like glue. I tell him to pretend it's a loud rock band in the sky.

In today's storm I decided to stand out on my covered front porch and take photos of raindrops falling on the Silver Maple tree in front of my house. My porch gave me cover from the pouring rain. 

Little did I know that my camera was about to teach me something about the leaves of my Silver Maple until I opened the results of my photos in Picassa. It was then that  I noticed the textured under-sides of the leaves were holding a multitude of raindrops while the upper-sides were smooth and acted more as a slide for the raindrops. At first this organization of the leaf pattern stumped me. 

The photo at the top is the whitish-green under-sides of the Maple leaves loaded with "held" raindrops of all sizes.. The photo at the bottom of this post is the green upper-side of the Maple leaves showing their slick skin with barely a drop clinging. It appears that Mother Nature has designed the leaves so that the under-side stores the raindrops for tree use while the upper-side slides the raindrops to the earth below. If that is true, I'd say that is darn good system on the part of Mother Nature!

All connected -- for the benefit of all.


Silver Maple upper-side slick green pattern



18 comments:

  1. That was quite interesting Barbara; I learned something new today! Hope you had a great 4th.

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    1. What I find interesting about taking photos is that sometimes you get surprises in your photo results. I had a quiet 4th -- enjoyed listening to the frogs and toads in the low areas of where I live. On the 4th their sounds were rather soft and few but by last night their sounds were especially loud as they sang out the praises of the wonderful rain storm we had. thanks -- barbara

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  2. I didn't know that! Mother Nature seems to have her act together. Great pics & send some rain our way...we need it!

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    1. Mother Nature constantly educates me as I stumble through my life. Helps that I live in a rather wild place. We needed rain so bad as we were in a fire risk zone. We really could use a bit more in the coming weeks to help the wild things. Hope you get some rain soon -- barbara

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  3. Barbara,
    Interesting observation. With the underside holding the moisture when the sun pops out the underside would be shaded. A trees roots grow out to the edge of its leaves so shed water will soak the ground outside the foliage circumference. The roots then most grow out to capture water.

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    1. Grampy -- yes you make another good observation -- the shaded and textured underside being shaded and thus keeping the moisture with the tree for a longer period of time. So the slick side provides immediate water within the drip line while the textured underside hold the water for later shedding within the drip line. Good thinking on your part. Now I am wondering if other types of trees have the same system? -- barbara

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  4. Mother Nature knows her onions ;)

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    1. Jayne -- I am sure in your country of Australia that you have very unique plants. Would be fascinating to know about the peculiarities of them. thanks -- barbara

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  5. Mother nature is amazing. She can be loud and commanding, yet so simple and gentle.

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    1. Yesterday, she was of the loud and demanding type -- storm lasting for a goodly amount of time -- but we so needed it. Noticed a tree down on the way to town last night. Looked like a lightning strike hit it -- thanks barbara

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  6. Sweet blog, Barbara. I so look forward to what you have to share with us in each one of your musings. Your pictures are stand-alone stories and give me mental snapshots of where you live. Thank you.

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    1. Nature Weaver -- Thanks for the nice comment -- we are all so fortunate to have the blogosphere to use for writings, photos, meeting folks, and learning about the world. -- barbara

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  7. That's fascinating -- it even seems to defy the laws of gravity but some other law must be at work -- survival, perhaps. They're beautiful pictures and I have a mental picture of you on the porch during the storm, camera in hand. I also love summer storms, unless I'm driving in them.

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    1. June -- I do not like to drive in summer storms either. If its a wicked one I usually pull off the road to a gas station until it blows by. Storms can be so dramatic. I suppose that is one reason we like them. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  8. Great photographs! Somehow they make me feel cooler in this hot weather. I love storms and fortunately our dogs do too. We sit on the porch and watch the lightning and rain. And yesterday some hail as well.

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    1. NCmountainwoman -- it sure has been hot in the south and east. Today temps are 101 in Central KY. Goldens, with all their fur seem to find this hot weather unbearable, at least mine does. Sal loves AC. Sitting on your porch is a great way to experience a storm. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  9. Nature wasn't born yesterday, as you have so very nicely documented :-)

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    1. RuneE -- You got that right -- it knows what it is doing and it doesn't seem good. I'm alluding to climate change. -- thanks -- barbara

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