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Wednesday, July 18, 2012

DROUGHT


Hearing that the drought is affecting crops in 29 states, Kentucky being one of them, I thought I would visit some local gardens to see how the corn is doing. Corn and soybeans are suffering the most under the current dry spell. 

A photo of  local garden corn told the story around here -- as you can see it was drying up before producing full ears of corn. 

I guess this will mean higher costs for corn and soybean products -- which really are found in most processed food. 


12 comments:

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    1. Birdman -- the sad part is that it has impacted wild critters too. -- barbara

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  2. Our weather patterns seem to be continuing on the crazy side for yet another year. I wish everyone could get at least a little rain.

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  3. Mamabug -- Geez this drought has long tenacles -- even to your part of the country. We have had a few showers the last few days but not enough to pull us out of this mess. -- thanks -- barbara

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  4. Western NC rain has fallen in strange patterns. We have far above our normal in July yet ten miles away the fields are parched. Strange indeed. Our son lives in Indianapolis where it in record drought stage.

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    1. NCmountainwoman -- I have been through Indiana many times in the past and what I do remember about the state is their beautiful farms. Hard to fathom the natural destruction on the farmlands. Something we can't control? Can we? Many have pointed to the droughts that would occur due to human influenced climate change. But then again natural droughts have happened before. This drought does have me wondering.

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  5. It's been a record dry year up here near Ottawa, Ontario as well. Little snow in the winter, and now a summer drought.

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    1. Sheri -- Your weather in Ontario replicates what KY experienced in this past year. In Michigan, my native state, an old friend informed me that many of the farmers are mowing their corn fields as the crops have failed due to the drought. This drought is certainly far reaching? -- thanks -- barbara

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  6. We'll be eating a lot of local grass fed beef and rice and sweet potatoes. Better for us than corn and corn fed products. I never have taken to soy products, except for a little tofu now and then, so that's no loss.
    The drought sounds terrible. I hope it lets up on you.

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    1. Hattie -- As I understand it in some areas grass has even dried out and farmers are worried about feeding their cattle. It's the connections that happen in such an event as a drought. I recently picked up this book at the library,Advanced Civilizations of Prehistoric America: The Lost Kingdoms of the Adena, Hopewell, Mississippians, and Anasazi by Frank Joseph. It covered the expirations of certain civilizations that covered large parts of the U.S. at one time. Of course everything is theoretical. -- thanks -- barbara

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  7. Do Kentucky farmers use field drainage tiling in their fields? In our part of the country, every field is tiled. Can't help but wonder if this isn't depleting our subsoil moisture.

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  8. Nature Weaver, I do not know if KY farmers use drainage tiles -- All I know is that the Midwest agricultural states tile. Several years ago I found a large county ledger in an Ohio antique shop that identified all the old drainage tiled fields on farms in the county. I didn't buy it but was tempted for preservation sake. It was priced very reasonably. I was astounded that the county had somehow let this valuable ledger disappear from its records.

    You raise a good question. I knew that water diversion caused by tiling fields had reduced animal habitats along flyways. I had not thought about the subsoil and the valuable moisture base it provides to plants if there is a drought. I took a quick look online and realized that subsoils in many areas are low in adequate moisture. Good ole wiki had an excellent write up -- here is the link -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tile_drainage#History_of_tile_drainage

    Thanks for the stimulating question -- barbara

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