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Sunday, July 22, 2012

PRIMITIVE STONE/ROCK ART

OLD THREE STORY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

While out playing camera sleuth last evening I came upon a beautiful example of primitive stone/rock art. Almost hidden from the community it offered a great repose from the commercialization of the town. It was both old and new in its presentation.

The stone/rock art is a retaining wall that runs about thirty feet along the side of an alley. Its height is about 15 feet at its highest. Across from the wall is an old three story commercial building leaving a narrow pedestrian alley running between the building and the wall.


Above is the first glimpse I got of the stone wall -- part shadow, part sun. Upon closer inspection I noticed the diversity of the old stone and rocks and the few human touches that looked recently added. One recent addition appeared to be a narrow garden bed at the foot of the wall.


Given the types of stone work within the wall I estimated the age to be from about the time of the early 1900s. Rather primitive yet absolutely beautiful with the color variation of  rocks and stones. One metal window with a cross-hatched screen was inset in the wall, rather a mystery as to why. 


Large boulders are found along the bottom tier of the wall. Their beauty can be viewed above. Notice the bottoms of inset blue bottles behind the plants


This middle wall section with the pottery sun is filled with what I call a cement mix with gravelly type stone. The sun is a newer addition inset with a newer cement mix.


Art work pieces adorn the wall -- a hanging metal pot -- a  small blue container inset in the rock wall, gives one the human art feeling. The wall part behind the blue planter is gravelly but without the colors or beauty of the lower two thirds of the wall. Yet its crudeness lends itself to the human and natural drama of the wall.

The wall is shaped with nature and appreciated by the human mind. Beauty can be just around the corner in the least likely spots.

20 comments:

  1. What an interesting wall! There's a complexity that is fascinating and suggests many people have contributed to this one wall over a great many years. You are quite a camera sleuth indeed!

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    1. June -- I don't know the background of the wall. Sometimes I really don't want to know the background of something if it makes my imagination soar. My imagination can sometimes provide a better interpretation. Just like you interpreting that the wall grew by contributions over the years -- art does that -- we formulate and feel what is happening. thanks -- barbara

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  2. I like seeing this type of art tucked into a wall.

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    1. Michelle -- Thanks for stopping by -- art is always a pleasure to bump into unexpectantly -- barbara

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  3. Fascinating!!!! I love old structures like this!!!

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    1. Kay -- Perhaps you like the natural material used with the newer artsy pieces -- thanks barbara

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    2. I just have thing for old buildings of any kind -- new construction leaves me cold.

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  4. How beautiful in all its rustic beauty. I also really enjoyed the artwork. Such a wonderful post~~~

    Jan

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    1. Jan -- Good name to call it Jan -- rustic beauty. Not everyone likes "rustic beauty," but people like yourself appreciate it. -- thanks for the nice words -- barbara

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  5. Barbara, I'd call this the Wall of Wonders. How intriguing the more recent touches of simplistic art forms. Good eye!

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    1. Nature Weaver -- Another good name for the artsy wall -- Wall of Wonder. I don't know how it evolved into a piece of art but I sure enjoyed seeing it. I have a feeling that many do not know it exists. Yes, it is simplistic with both new and natural old materials which together make you stop in your tracks. Photos did not do it justice. thanks -- barbara

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  6. Exquisite! The native stone and lovely bricks and the occasional decorative pieces make this so lovely. Thanks for this.

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    1. Hattie -- In some ways I wonder if the original native stone work was planned to look so unique or did it just evolve over time?? Anyway, it is an eclectic look -- thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  7. Your wall reminds me of some we saw in England -- but there they had evolved over centuries... Beautiful to see the different styles.

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    1. Vicki -- this area has a long legacy of masonry work of all kinds reaching from the past into the twentieth century. Perhaps this wall is a left over of that heritage. One can only guess. thanks -- barbara

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  8. That's an interesting alley. We have a small alley in Ripley.I'd say small delivery trucks used to go through it, but only people walk through it now.

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    1. Janet -- I agree with you. Alleyways have a certain mystic about them especially when they visually present something you are not familiar with. Thanks -- barbara

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  9. Stone walls are so intriguing to me. They hold so much... even more here.

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    1. Birdman -- I know New England has a rich history embedded in their stone walls. Maine's historic material is mind boggling. -- thanks -- barbara

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  10. Barbara, your wonderful post stirred me to want to take a hodgepodge of stone and brick I have accumulated over the years and create my own memory wall. I have crates of old bottles that would make the perfect accent pieces. My list is long but with this post I can at least see it in my minds eye.

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