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Sunday, July 15, 2012

BROKEN CONNECTIONS


Queen Anne's Lace are bursting forth in my wild fields. They are almost ephemeral as I gaze at their gauzy lace flower heads moving with gentle breezes that are almost constantly flowing across my ridge. 

Some folks are absolutely stalwart in their negative feelings about such a beautiful plant. I hear, " they don't belong here or they are from another country or they are not native." Even the U. S. government officials join the negative chorus of voices. For a minute, I almost feel like they are talking about human immigrants. 




The comments resonate over the air waves in an erratic pattern hoping to win the minds of the people that are listening. 

I walk in my fields. I look at my Queen Anne's Lace so beautiful in composure. "So you are the culprits of my field," I say to them -- "even though you are part of the field community -- adding  beauty, giving beneficial insects food, even homes to small predatory spiders doing what they always have done plus more of which I am unaware."


Are our connections becoming broken to the beauty of  life?




23 comments:

  1. That first picture is amazing! I just was at the farm and took some pics of some Queen Anne's Lace too...no nearly as good as your pictures. Thanks for sharing these.

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  2. turquoisemoon -- I hope you post your pics. Everyone has there own version of different subject matter and I bet yours are great. -- thanks --- barbara

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  3. The "evil sister of Queen Anne's Lace," or wild parsnip, is expanding itself in our area. The invasive plant causes a rash that leads to blisters, and some sources are saying the wild parsnip can cause temporary or permanent blindness. Our newspapers and magazine articles warn not to touch these plants.

    I, for one, have always loved Queen Anne's Lace. They are now gracing our landscapes, and are so dainty. Their undersides are equally intriguing. I'm fearful that we are growing disconnected from nature. Our kids aren't being introduced to Mother Nature like we were, and for that I'm very sad.

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    1. Nature Weaver -- Nice to hear that you like Queen Anne's Lace. I know there are plants similar to Queen Anne's Lace that are very toxic. I have not seen any around my place but out West I saw fields of poison hemlock. Wild Parsnip is usually yellow flowered. Lots of info about these toxic plants online. Have you read Becoming Animal by David Abram? Good book about nature and us. thanks -- barbara

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  4. We have so much of it here on our farm. I think it is delightful.

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    1. Michelle -- I'm with you -- delightful they are. I like the combination of the creamy Queen Anne's Lace with Blue Chicory along rural roads. thanks -- barbara

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  5. Lovely pictures of a flower (I was told they're weeds) I used to pick for bouquets as rural a youngster. I wished they had a pleasant scent instead of the somewhat tart or brittle scent they have.

    People like to take up safe causes, invasive species is one of the trendy causes -- I can understand the feeling about kudzo or the Asian carp but I don't understand a dislike of something that has been here so long -- it's like going back to the first colonists. Yes, we are an invasive people and have done far more harm that a mere plant, a pretty one at that.

    I hope this comment comes through, a couple haven't lately.

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    1. June -- your words ring true. Who are the invasive ones? Ask Black Elk. I really don't see any trendy ways being enacted around here. It's pretty earthy out here in the backwater areas. I like it that way. Thanks for the nice comment about my photos. I would imagine there would be lots of interesting plants along the ocean. -- barbara

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    2. Some interesting plants, near the ocean, but I find myself wishing I had your skills with the camera (and such a good camera) when I look at what's washed up on the shore and also when I drive some of the old two-lane roads with wonderful houses from many eras. The cemeteries are another fascinating subject and so are the churches. Alas, my skills are not yours -- I think we each look a lot and process the looking and thinking with our own talents.

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    3. June, we all have our own individual skills -- the thought you mentioned about each of us looking and processing with our own talents is true. I listen with an almost deft ear most times where you hear music. If I had a musical talent like you maybe I could hear the rhythmic notes of the waves in new ways and dance to the beat of the birds wings as they fly over the water. I would love to know about the places you mentioned in your scouting territory. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  6. Wonderful photos and post. We each can do our part right where we're at and sometimes that creates change. I'd like to think more people are waking up, but sometimes it's hard to see it. I'll keep looking... :)

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    2. Teresa -- I like your words of we can do our part right where we're at. Our planet is a fabulous home to so many species. Just like we try to eat local we could try to connect to all life locally. Thanks -- barbara

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  7. I have always loved Queen Anne's lace!!! Your photos are great!!

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    1. Kay -- thanks for the nice words. Even though some folks think they are a nasty weeds many gardeners today are growing them in their flower beds. thanks -- barbara

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  8. Are those Mason bees in the first picture?

    I like Queen Anne's lace too. :-)

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    1. Birdie -- Glad to hear you also like Queen Anne's Lace. No, those are not bumble bees in the first photo on the top of my post. They appear to be tiny wasps that are both pollinators and predators of insects. Adult wasps need nectar sources in the form of abundant, tiny flowers. Flowers whose nectaries are too small for honeybees to exploit. Queen Anne's Lace is abundant with tiny flowers. All wasps which includes hornets and yellow-jackets are beneficial insects for our yards and gardens. I have all kinds in my field and around my house. I treat them with utmost respect and leave them alone. In five years I have not gotten stung. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  9. Funny. Almost posted some QAL today. I love the wildness of the plant. Such beauty for a weed!

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    1. Birdman -- If you like its beauty I would say it is not a weed in your eyes. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  10. I for one do not pay any attention when I read invasive species. If a plant, fish, bird, insect, etc, flourish it is in its natural habitat the way I see it. The strong and in the case the lovely survive.

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    1. I have studied a few of our invasive species and have come up with my own personal thoughts that are somewhat similar to yours. One is that humans are shuffling nature's species all over the world resulting in invasions. Secondly, is that nature deals with new situations in the best way possible. And lastly, we cannot completely understand invasions because of the depth and complexities involved. Humans seem to have brought us this invasion problem and so far they have only made the situation worst with their remedies. Lets all settle back and realize what is -- is. Just my one person thoughts. thanks -- barbara

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  11. Giving me an idea for a camera club photo on Mother Natures designs. This is quite beautiful, thanks for sharing. I have a field of them in my backyard.

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    1. Diane -- Nice that you have a viable camera club to belongs to. they tried to start one here but many times I was the only one that showed up. I quit going for that reason. Shake a leg with your nature photography -- lots of good subjects in the summer -- thanks -- barbara

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