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Sunday, August 14, 2011

AN OLD FLOOR PATCH


Above is an old floor section which resides in a second floor bedroom of an almost two hundred year old log house. Within this section you will notice a tight fitting square patch that has aged similar to the original floor. 


The elderly owner told me that the patch has been there as long as he can remember -- his home has always been in his family since it was built. 


I took the photo of the old patch because it reminded me of the saying, " a stitch in time saves nine."  The saying means with a little effort up front to fix a problem  -- one can prevent  problems down the road. 


I feel life is like that.  

23 comments:

  1. It reminds me of a koan almost. I kept staring at it wondering what happened that they needed the patch. I wouldn't mind having this as a picture hanging on my wall to tell you the truth.

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  2. I was never wise enough to do this, but as they say ' better late than never.' :0)

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  3. I wonder why they made the neatly-fitted patch across the grain rather than with it.

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  4. The one I try to live by is: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

    Here are the links you requested!

    http://kaysthinkingcap.blogspot.com/2009/07/and-its-another-fun-day-in-kays-world.html

    http://kaysthinkingcap.blogspot.com/2009/07/come-on-my-house-part-i.html

    http://kaysthinkingcap.blogspot.com/2009/07/come-on-my-house-part-ii.html

    http://kaysthinkingcap.blogspot.com/2009/07/come-on-my-house-part-iii.html

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  5. Sheri -- I thought the very same thing. I imagine they had to whittle the piece and it might have been easier to whittle the piece working with the grain for the shape they needed? Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  6. Carole Anne -- I do believe in the adage -- better late than never -- it applies to so many things in life. I have a feeling you are very wise. -- barbara

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  7. Linda -- Its nice that you understood what I saw. Sometimes people pass by small things and they don't stop to see its value -- its as if they have a language to share with us humble humans. -- barbara

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  8. Hubby had to put in a patch in a couple of boards, we've aged it up but I'm hoping it will be as good as that patch for my grandkids :)

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  9. I wonder how many people, these days, would even know how to put in a patch like that. And, you know that, if you got a contractor, he'd tell you that the whole floor had to be replaced.

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  10. Kay -- thanks for the links and the comment. I checked out the link and ii and iii did not connect. -- barbara

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  11. Jayne I am sure they will be there for the grand kids. Like Kay above noted, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Thanks -- barbara

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  12. Louise -- Yes I did think that was a dandy fitting patch. And I know you are right that a contractor would tell you that you needed a whole new floor. Funny, but more than likely true. Thanks -- barbara

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  13. Mostly the "stitch in time" doesn't happen people many people don't notice the small things as you noticed that patch -- as did, of course, the person who did the patching. Being aware comes first -- we noticed and now your readers are noticing.

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  14. We have one of these too in our 200 year old farmhouse.

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  15. When I look at this floor patch, I can't help but think of the word "character". This floor and its patch has a story to tell which gives it more life than any perfect floor has. Life is full of nicks and dents reflected on the surfaces we live on. Leaving these dents as is brings character to a place, a colorfulness that shows one has led an interesting life.

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  16. Looks like one of my fixes. Difficult for me to throw away scraps of lumber. One never knows when they might need a patch. If it is equipment requiring repair I always keep some baling wire handy. Enjoy the photo. Great capture of a fix.

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  17. Noticing something small and acting can often avoid a crises later on. I love this saying and use it often. Another truism is "the squeaky wheel gets the grease." Have a great day. Dianne

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  18. June -- Some folks "get right on it." in their pursuit to keep thing fixed while I've noticed others wait until the last minute to fix something and then it is almost too late. I guess the personality of the person has a lot to do about fixing something. Thanks -- barbara

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  19. Grampy -- You must have the art of patching down to a science. The patch in my post was done so well. Good scraps of lumber are best kept. Good that you do so. Oh I see you agree that the personality of a person has something to do with fixing something. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  20. Darcy, I agree, character, that really tells us a lot about the use of the floor. A well done patch tells me it was done by either a perfectionist, a caring person, or a master craftsman. I wonder which of the above did the work? -- barbara

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  21. Birdman -- Old houses such as yours are treasures for sure. I imagine you can read the "language" of your house. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  22. Dianne -- I always imagine old sages sitting around spouting out these old truisms based on their experience with life -- and then the truisms becoming part of our language for eons because they fit so many situations. Thanks -- barbara

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  23. I love that patch! We had friends who live in an old Appalachian cabin where previous owners had made a patch in the floor with a flattened Maxwell House coffee can.

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