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Monday, August 15, 2011

APPALACHIAN HOME PLACE ROCKCASTLE COUNTY


Common Appalachian family home (now vacant) in central Kentucky built early 1900s. 

24 comments:

  1. I could write a great book from that wonderful photograph. So sad that it takes me ages just finishing those stories I've begun.

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  2. The central chimney, which in a log home would be called a saddle bag floor plan. Correct?

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  3. Farmchick -- saddlebags do have a central chimney but not all central chimneys are saddlebags. This particular house was built about the early 1900s after sawmills were made accessible to rural areas. Saddlebags were earlier -- they began as log houses then as the need for space grew an addition was put on the gable end and sometimes the addition was frequently sawn board. So the front facade would look half log and half board
    with a center chimney. A similar house to the saddlebag is the dog trot with an open center hall running down the center from back to front.

    Kentucky Folk Architecture by Montell and Moore covers the early types.

    Thanks for the comments -- barbara

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  4. Carol Anne -- i bet you could. Perhaps a mystery. You are a busy woman writing as you do. Writing one book is quite an accomplishment but writing many is amazing.

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  5. Hmm, saddlebag, dog trot, very interesting. I'm not familiar with those styles at all. Around here, a chimney on one or both ends of the building is the norm. Thanks for the info.

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  6. I can't tell you how many times I have seen similar houses. I loved the photograph.

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  7. Interesting, isn't it, how types of house reflect the area that they are built in. We don't have any houses like that around here. Most of the houses built around that time period around here are distinctly Victorian. But, the distinctive type of house built in this area is the cobblestone. If you're interested, check out this blog I did about the village that has been a part of my life since I was born. There are a couple of cobblestones featured there.
    http://livingretiredinwesternnewyorkstate.blogspot.com/2010/10/western-new-york-village.html

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  8. This is a beautiful photo.
    There are houses like this around here but the roof is often caved in. You find this in the middle of towns. Sad.

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  9. Loved this Barbara! There used to be alot of old houses built in the dogtrot style in this area of Florida. It's hard to find one still standing now. My hubby's grandparents had an old dogtrot home but it to is long gone.

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  10. Sheri -- I am not real famliar with architecture in your area -- the folk style is the type I mean. Perhaps there is a book you could recommend on your area? I have lived in various sections of the U. S. and each has had building styles particular to their area. Again I am talking about folk architecture. Thanks for your comments -- barbara

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  11. NCmountainwoman -- In your part of the country I imagine you see very similar styles as they are influenced by the Appalachian region. I'm glad you liked the photo. And I thank you for your input on similar houses -- barbara

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  12. Mama-Bug -- Did not realize that Flordia had so many dogtrots. Unfortunate that they have practically disappeared. Hope you have a photo of your husband's grandparents old dogtrot home. Kentucky, from what I have read, never did have many dogtrots. I have only seen one. I think a lot of them could be hid under siding and closures to the actual dogtrot. If I do find one I certainly will post it as I believe some folks don't know what wew are talking about when we refer to dogtrots.

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  13. Louise -- Yes, it is interesting that houses reflect their area. Visited your town post -- cobblestone is very artistic -- could be from the hands of one builder during that early period. Thanks -- barbara

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  14. Linda -- At first I thought Oklahoma would have different types of folk homes -- but I looked on the Upland South area map and part of Oklahoma falls in that region. Usually I see homes decaying badly in the country, not in small towns -- unfortunate that this is happening in your small towns. Thanks -- barbara P.S. I watched Bagdad Cafe tonight from your post recommendation and thought it was five stars.

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  15. I learn a lot from your posts. Saddlebags? There's new on for me. Thanks.
    Home is where the heart is.

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  16. The dimensions and groundplan look quite familiar; the UK has houses like this - brickbuilt or stone. They would be unknown on the continent (Europe).

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  17. That is very familiar looking to the old houses here in WV, too.

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  18. Friko -- I will do a little research of folk housing in your area. Do you have a book you could recommend. I do know that housing types were brought over with the immigrants such as the Irish. Scots, English and Germans in the early years of this country. They were influential in our housing types -- sometimes in a hybrid form. Thanks for informing me on this. -- barbara

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  19. Birdman -- Yes, a house type called a saddlebag. I am going to try and find one in the area if possible so I can explain with a photo. Thanks for stopping by. -- barbara

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  20. Love the photo and the architectural information. This poor house didn't weather well once it was abandoned but it could inspire a very fine poem if a local poet chanced upon it in the right mood.

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  21. Janet -- I think this type of house can be fond over most of the Appalachian area. I like the comment from Friko (above) saying that this type can be found in England too but not anywhere else in Europe. I do know that English were one of the ethnic groups that helped settle the Appalachian area. Wonder if this type is an English influence?

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  22. June -- I think it would make great poem material and also wonderful artist material. Families are strong in the Applachian area and the old homestead, even if it is not being lived in, usually is left on the land for memory sake by the family.

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  23. Having difficulty commenting on here, but will try again to tell you I love the photos you take. You have quite the eye and started me looking for interesting architecture old and new.

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  24. Diane -- Thanks for the nice comment. I especially like the old architecture. I am sure you will find lots of good examples both old and new -- happy hunting -- barbara

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