.

.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

LOCAL TAILGATE FARMERS

TAILGATE FARMERS GEORGE AND ROY ON THE RIGHT.
 A canopy tent adjacent to the truck's hatch provides protection from the elements

You hardly see farmers selling their produce along side of the road anymore. But if you know where they are likely to set up you hightail to those spots when you know garden crops have reached maturity. 


Above are two two Kentucky farmers selling tailgate style along highway 25 by Richmond. Today they are selling fresh picked Silver Queen corn from George's fields. 


George has been a farmer all his life. Roy was born and raised in Kentucky but moved away with the service and then worked 40 plus years in Indiana. He now lives back in Kentucky. I asked  him why he moved back after being away for so many years and he said, " why it's home." and George picked up on that and added, " Kentucky is always in your blood." 


Together they keep busy as they sell to cars and trucks that stop at their spot. They told me they always sell out of corn each time they set-up -- "why just the other day a dump truck stopped and bought 30 dozen ears from us." I asked them why such a load of corn? They told me they just sell, they don't ask what they are going to do with it.  They laughed.


Their best sellers are cantaloupe and tomatoes -- they always sell out early with these crops.  They sell pumpkins in the fall -- I'm looking forward to that time. I will be checking with them about the pumpkins as they tell me they sell quickly. 


These two men represent the friendliness of native Kentuckians -- always making you feel comfortable when you are asking lots of questions.

20 comments:

  1. Corn season traditionally brings out the tailgate markets around here. There are usually pickups selling corn and sometimes other veggies set up at regular intervals on major roads. Some years back, Peaches and Cream corn became popular and now just about everyone sells a white-and-yellow corn. Once corn season starts, we rarely let a day pass without enjoying a fresh cob. Good subject, Barbara.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Some of the farmers do that here in the outlying areas or they set up at the markets in Amish country or at the flea market just north of us on Mondays.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Kay -- Sounds like a tradition in your part of the state. Nice to know how this works in other areas. Thanks -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sheri -- Your area has quite a choice of tailgate farmers to buy corn from. Perhaps you remember when it was common for farmers to have small stands set up in front of their farmhouse -- out by the roadside. This was before tailgaters. Thanks -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  5. Tailgaters here sell a lot of watermelons also. Never bought one from them. Might have to this years as I did not plant melons.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Grampy -- Ahh watermelon -- haven't had any to eat in years. Maybe its time I tried to find a nice local farmer that sells them. Thanks -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yummm, I love Silver Queen Corn. I could be wrong but I think you can make moonshine from it. I think they call it corn squeezings. Dianne

    ReplyDelete
  8. Do you remember the days when you could put your extra garden crops out by the side of the road with a tin can? Not only would people put money in the can, but the one who bought the last of the produce would put the can on your back steps. You farmers reminded me of that.

    ReplyDelete
  9. You see them a lot around here, SE Oklahoma, but the thing is they don't even have canopies to protect them from the sun when it is over 100 degrees. I always want to stop but it is just too dang hot to even think twice about it. I don't know how those guys do it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Dianne -- Aha, I didn't know you could make moonshine from Silver Queen. Maybe, that is why the man with the dump truck bought 30 ears! Thanks -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  11. Louise, When I lived in Oregon there were several road-side stands that you just picked out what you wanted, glanced at the homemade chart of what the items cost, and then dropped your money usually in a coffee can. Trust is important to a community -- I'm afraid it has slipped in some areas. -- thanks for the story -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  12. Linda -- Egads, how could they stand the heat that we have been having across the country. It seems like they would park under trees if they didn't have a canopy. -- Thanks for stopping by -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  13. Barbara, you didn't say how the corn was when you ate it. Yes, I realize there are only two grades of fresh sweet corn: great and wonderful. Shame it's a short season. Regards the honor system for produce, we still have that in our area, especially among the Mennonite farmers. And this has been a banner year for watermelon. Jim

    ReplyDelete
  14. Jim -- thanks for the comments. The corm was very good. Nice that you have an honor system where you live. I think in certain areas one can still find honest folks. Maybe lots of areas?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Always the best way to get local produce, if you don't grow it yourself.

    ReplyDelete
  16. This is the time for corn -- going, going, almost gone in my garden.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks for another glimpse into Kentucky life and people. I love roadside produce stands...can't get much better than buying produce from the man or woman who grew it.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Farmchick -- Agree. Or at a farmers market perhaps. Thanks for stopping -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  19. Vicki -- I bet it is delicious. Always nice to pick local produce right out of your own garden. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  20. Rose -- Roadside stands are rare nowadays. Seems like only these loaded with produce trucks are selling beside the road. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete