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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

PARCHED



As we slide toward early fall here in Oregon I look around at the environment and wonder if our rains will return in time to build up our rivers for the fish  -- especially the fall run of salmon on our rivers. Oregon has been mostly void of any rains since May and this has resulted in low river flows with high temperatures that fish cannot do well in -- many have died. The trees and shrubs appear dried out in many places. Above is a leaf I spotted that represents the desiccated look of  the leaves that are falling in large numbers off many trees. Granted there are a major portion of trees still going fairly strong. A quick look at wild areas brings home the parched look of some trees and other plants. What can we do about it. I bet you know.  Everyone should know. It is everyone's problem.



This is a photo that I took of Oregon's Siuslaw River that was roaring along its 110 mile path toward the ocean in early summer of this year.  


This is the same river with its photo taken in the same spot as the above last photo. Now it looks more like a wading pool than a river. State officials are now either curtailing fishing on Oregon's rivers or prohibiting fishing altogether to reduce stress levels. 


My son took this photo a few weeks ago of an eagle sitting contemplatively by the Siuslaw River. Many eagles call this river home. In fact a whole population of wild critters and plants call Oregon rivers their home. 

The end of this tale is yet to be told. 

21 comments:

  1. I was mildly chastised for feeding the birds year round. I am no longer young enough or nimble enough to stand in front of the bulldozers all around me reducing their habitat to apartments; it's what I do now.

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    1. Joanne -- Encroachment on the rural land. Sad to hear. I imagine it was rezoned with neighbors consent? The population has grown exponentially -- housing is in short supply in so many areas. What can we do, what sort of solutions will change this ongoing push of changing land use? Have you noticed a change in the bird population around your place? -- thanks -- barbara

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  2. What a beautiful area. The photo of the eagle is just a great capture.

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    1. Michelle -- The eagle sat on that tree limb for quite a time -- allowed us to really get a wonderful look at his plumage. When he flew off it was like a clap of mother nature -- rustling the limbs and leaves surrounding him. thanks -- barbara

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  3. Great before/after photos of the Siuslaw. And the eagle photo is a prize winner!

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    1. Barbara -- The rocks you see in the after photo are the river rocks found at the bottom of a river. Gives you an idea of the now depth of the river. The river is full of salmon in the fall -- we need a ton of rain between now and then to help them make their way to their spawning grounds. thanks -- barbara

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  4. I don't know how much difference my going out on my bicycle will help, but lets hope for a happy ending anyway.

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    1. John -- Ah -- your a good man indeed. Bikes are popular around here also. I gave my bike to my granddaughter at one time but now I am considering asking for it back. She is off to college in New York City and I thinking she'll probably be doing commuter trains and buses. Keep pumping and save the environment a little bit at a time. thanks -- barbara

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  5. It is going to be a sad tail. Resilience is mother nature's calling card, so we can hope.

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    1. Tabor -- good thought -- resilience is mother nature's calling card. She is going to be one tough resilient mother if we make it through this sad situation. thanks -- barbara

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  6. Your pictures of the river tell the story vividly, I wouldn't have guessed it is the same place. The picture of the leave, as a picture is lovely, as an example of the unseasonable dryness it makes a statement too. I don't think I've ever seen a photo of an eagle looking thoughtful -- they usually seem alert to the environment or simply grand, but this one has a meditative look. Wonderful pictures.

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    1. June -- Life is always with us -- so when it starts to fade a bit we wonder what this all will come to in the future. Forest fires are a great concern out here. All around my place is dried plant material. One spark and everything could go up in flames. Eagles are so majestic -- feel privileged when I get to gaze at one sitting so majestically in a tree. Thanks -- barbara

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  7. The lack of water & dryness is so sad...I thought of you recently when I watched a Nature show on Public Television: The River of No Return, on the Salmon River in Idaho. The film of the salmon swimming/jumping upstream was astoundingly amazing. I was fortunate to go out west several times on cross country camping trips. What a beautiful country out there. Nature, even without the interference of humans, is on a constant course of change.

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    1. Rita -- Change is a big factor in nature, I think. I look at our major cities with their parks and realize that although it is nice to have parks in our cities they really are completely different in natural make-up from the days of settlers. The parks only handle a handful of what was once there.Thanks for the book recommendation -- I will track it down. Nice that you have had several opportunities to visit the west. Your PBS mention -- might be able to find that program somewhere online.
      Agree completely with your last sentence. thanks -- barbara

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  8. Yes, we experienced the dry Northwest, and now at home in Hawaii we are experiencing insufferable humidity as a hurricane approaches.

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    1. Hattie -- This has been an interesting season of heat, humidity and wildfires. Wonder what the fall and winter will bring? -- barbara

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  9. But if things continue the way they do at present, we can guess the end of the story ...
    And it is not a Happy Ending.

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    1. visualnorway -- yes, we can guess the end of the story -- let's hope it is not to late to change the ending! -- barbara

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    2. visualnorway -- yes, we can guess the end of the story -- let's hope it is not to late to change the ending! -- barbara

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  10. Oh please! Refrain from using that dreaded word fall. I will come soon enough and then it's win.... GRIN.

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    1. Birdman -- Being that we have had a spring and summer full of over 100 degrees I for one am looking forward to fall. -- barbara

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