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Friday, August 14, 2015

bird attacks loss of feathers

Remaining bird feathers from a predator attack

Recently I was walking across my front yard when I noticed a circle of feathers lying on the ground about two feet in diameter. The feathers were strewn helter-skelter within the diameter. I felt that some bird had met its maker in this very spot. No body parts or blood were on the ground. But who was the predator and what kind of bird did the feathers belong to. 

But is also could be feather remains from a bird that got away from a predator.


Circle of remaining bird feathers after the attack

I was certainly curious about what had transpired. Anyone have any idea what could have happened in this circle? I have thought of several predators such as owl, hawk, or cat -- all of these critters live around my area. A puzzle to be sure. 



20 comments:

  1. That is actually quite creepy. Once when I was walking I saw a foot of a seagull. Nothing else, just the foot.

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    1. Birdie -- when you found the foot did you look around the nearby ground to see if it looked like a predator attack? When I took a hard look at the remains on the ground I was mesmerized by the colors and the definition of the feathers. thanks -- barbara

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  2. Well, hard to say really....I would venture that it was a bird that escaped a predator.

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    1. Michelle -- This could be a lucky escape. Birds can be tough cookies. I have seen them fly hard into a window, pass out underneath it, then eventually get up off the ground, shake it off and fly away. There was no window near where I found these feathers. But again birds can be tough. And sometimes lucky. thanks -- barbara

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  3. I suspect the worst, (or the best if you're the predator, I suppose).

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    1. John, Either way -- in nature one always loses something -- their dignity, some feathers, or their life -- such is Mother Natures rules. thanks -- barbara

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  4. I'm no expert on birds, but my humble suggestion would suggest that the victim may have been a not-quite adult gull.

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    1. Oh, a juvenile perhaps. never thought of that. There are many juvenile birds in the area right now. Perhaps if not a gull a similar type bird. But maybe a gull as they have been travelling far and wide as we are in a drought here and birds seem to be ranging in larger areas. thanks -- barbara

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  5. I have found the same with a blue bird and on my trip with a swan. It usually means the bird lost the flight and was carried away for a meal unfortunatley.

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    1. Tabor -- Well I accept that there are prey and predator -- it is a natural way for wild critters. In fact even for humans. I thought since there were only feathers that it would tell us what kind of animal would only leave feathers. thanks -- barbara

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  6. I don't know. Could there have been a tussle causing the bird to lose feathers and then the predator bird flying away with the bird victim? Does look like juvenile seagull feathers to me.

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    1. Hattie -- You know just yesterday I read that some feathers on a bird have the ability to shed from their body easily -- seems to be related to stressful situations. I've not seen any seagulls around here yet. I live 22 miles from the ocean. thanks -- barbara

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  7. I always find scenes like that somewhat unsettling... My Lucy dog brought me a rabbit foot a couple of weeks ago....sheesh! horrible way to wake up...

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    1. turquoisemoon -- Yes, death is unsettling. But that is the way of animals in the wild. Sad but necessary for their survival. -- thanks barbara

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  8. If there are no feet or head or bone remains, I'm guessing it survived the attack. The parts that aren't eaten might be a clue. But I don't have real knowledge, just guess. I've seen feathers like this from doves...but there weren't any other body parts either.

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    1. Barbara -- Good deduction. I have been looking at birds to see if they are a bit thin in feathers. Very good chance that could happen. thanks -- barbara

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  9. I am too much of a city girl to know...But I'm awed by your wanderings and observations in "the wild". I'd like to recommend a young person's novel to you: The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate. If you read it you'll know how this relates to your post. I'm re-reading it so that I can then read the recently published sequel.

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    1. Sketchbook Wandering -- Tracking down your book recommendation. Love to get notices of book related to nature and culture. Wouldn't it be nice to be able to read for hours everyday. -- thanks -- barbara

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  10. Being one hundred percent against the depredations of feral cats against birds I'm blaming them. And no they are not Mother Nature at work. This is a human created disaster by the uncounted millions....

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    1. Troutbirder -- I agree completely with your comment, barbara

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