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Monday, August 10, 2015

OLD RED ROUND BARN ALONG AN OREGON RURAL ROAD

Partial view on the east side of the round barn


Along Route 36 near the settlements of Triangle Lake and Blachly, Oregon is a huge red round barn. Its construction is wood with a metal conical roof, a cupola with ventilator and lots of windows for interior light. Roof needs serious work. I would guess it was once used for cattle or horses? Now it appears to be sitting empty waiting for its next adventure. Some small buildings have been attached to the barn. Passing the barn on the roadway one is likely to slow down taking in the magnificence of its size and wondering about its grandeur when it was younger.

This old red round barn sits on a country corner of farm land. I know nothing about who owns it or when it was built. If I were to guess a date I would say it was built in the late 1800s or early 1900s. 

The photos you see above and below were taken on two different days. The one above was the first one I took and the two below were taken a few weeks afterwards. The light was exceptional for my first one and the last two suffered a bit from weird natural light. I used the same camera so it wasn't the camera that captured them differently rather it was me the photographer. 


South view of the round barn





Above is an old wooden sign leaning against some of the fence posts south of the barn. The sign's significance is unknown. Visually its artistry captures the rural presence of the place.

Since taking the barn photos I have since found out there are still many old round barns remaining in Oregon.  Click here to view Dale Travis' list on Oregon Round Barns -- once you reach the page list, click on a highlighted number to view a photo

Do you have a round barn in your area?

ADDENDUM I:
A comment on this post from Darcy made me go searching for more info on this barn. Found this old photo from the 1900s within the Oregon State Archives OAG445.  Titled -- Octagonal milk house near Triangle Lake in Lane County Oregon. 



So according to this bit of history it was a dairy barn and octagonal although it looked round from the street where I was taking photos.

ADDENDUM II;
RE:  Wooden Sign photo in this post (above)
Commentator Darcy (see above) sent a Eugene Register newspaper article dated 1993 that describes a pheasant business that began on the 350 acre round/octagonal barn land in 1991. The pheasants were raised in the barn and released for hunting in the field surrounding the barn. Some pheasants were kept to sell to non-hunters. The article states that the owner, Chris Mooney, kept a steady supply of 1,200 barn raised pheasants.  Chris Mooney felt the barn was built in the early 1940s.

24 comments:

  1. I know of one in NE Ohio, white. I've never been able to stop and photograph it. It seems in fairly decent repair. I may have to scheme how to get it done. Sometimes my sister has chauffeured me on a photo expedition.
    When I was a child there was an octagonal barn in South Boardman, MI. It's about 30 miles south of Traverse City. I've looked for it twice as an adult, and cannot locate it.

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    1. Joanne -- Most states have lists of round barns -- sometimes octagonal and hexagonal ones too. Just type in the state and the type of barn you want to find online. Very familiar with the South Boardman area in MI. -- my native state. Look online in the Michigan round barn list - they have photos and you might be able to find it. thanks -- barbara

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    2. It is none other than the Thumb Octagon Barn! Thank you.

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    1. Hmmmm -- whatever do you mean? -- barbara

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  3. We have no round barns in the UK (as far as I know). I can't imagine the amount of work in building such a structure.

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    1. John -- round barns come in all sizes and construction types. They really are eye candy when you pass one even those in a decaying state. I imagine, like you, that to construct one would be considerably more difficult than raising a square or rectangular one. thanks -- barbara

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  4. There is a round barn out US50 in southeastern Indiana that I used to see frequently. I doubt it was as big as this red one, but it seemed to sit on a raised area (maybe a small hill) which made it seem imposing. I believe its roof was somewhat flatter. I think it's still there but I haven't been past it for almost ten years. An aunt used to remark nearly every time she was with us when we passed it that "the cats go crazy in there" -- her reference being (whether true or false, I don't know) that cats always look for a corner in which to "do their business".

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    1. June -- My question to you or anyone else that is interested is where do you suppose the idea of a round barn first began -- in the US or are they from another country? The barn you describe seems like a few that I have seen when I looked at images of round barns on google. I think having some type of saying when someone sees a round barn must be common in rural farm areas. My father always used to say, "that farmer built that round barn so the devil would not have any corner to hide in." Troutbirder (below) left a comment similar to yours. Check it out.
      thanks -- barbara

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  5. I've never seen buildings like this! I'm curious: how would you describe the differences between Kenucky and Oregon?

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    1. Rita -- in a simplified way I would say that Oregon is more diverse in its natural elements while KY is diverse in its cultural ways and rural architecture. Both are very interesting. Both have natural elements, cultural ways and rural architecture it is just that some are more evident in one state. Now all of you can pounce on what I just said. haha. -- thanks -- barbara

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  6. We have several in our area. I like them. Dogs not so much cause they can't find a corner to pee in.... sorry some time I can't help myself.

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    1. Troutbirder -- amazing how similar folk quotes can be found across state boundaries. June Calendar (above) quotes a similar phrase as you quoted that her aunt used. Only her aunt used a cat while you used a dog. Aunt lived in Indiana and you of course Minnesota. thanks -- barbara

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  7. What a fantastic structure. I have only see a couple of round barns before.

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    1. Michelle -- Actually there are tons of round barns in Kentucky. Check out this list by Dale Travis
      http://www.dalejtravis.com/rblist/rbky.htm
      This list will keep you and your family busy looking for round barns. If you don't want to go out looking many of the barns his lists include photos. --- barbara

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  8. it is an interesting barn. Horses seems a good guess, I think.

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    1. Melissa -- Your hunch just might be the use for this barn. I need to research round barns a bit more. Thanks -- barbara

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  9. Here is a link that offers more information about the barn and its sign you featured:
    https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19931129&id=qK9YAAAAIBAJ&sjid=g-oDAAAAIBAJ&pg=2526,6998983&hl=en

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    1. Darcy -- After I read your comment I tried your link and it would not work for me. So did a bit more online searching -- found this great old photo that identifies the barn as octagonal used as a dairy barn -- thanks for prodding me to look further into this barn's use and date. -- barbara

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  10. I saw a Shaker round barn once but think it had several stories and a flat rather than a peaked roof. I'll look up more info and link if I find something.

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    1. Hattie -- Shaker would be neat to see. When I lived in KY there was an old Shaker village not to far from where I lived. Fascinating folks they were. thanks -- barbara

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  11. There seems to be a lot of living history wherever you go - or you are just an expert in finding it. This was most interesting to see, since I have never seen anything like this before - and with a story to match.

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    1. visualnorway -- cultural research be it in nature, landscapes, music, people or architectures have always fascinated me, Perhaps that is why my posts read the way they do. It is wonderful to read and view other blogs that open new vistas for their readers. I do enjoy yours -- barbara.

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  12. Barbara.
    The round barn at Pheasant Ridge is a prominent part of my Childhood, as I was born and partially raised between here in Blachly( Triangle Lake) and east of the mountains in Bend Oregon.
    Currently,extended family still live just up the road from the barn, which is in serious need of structural repair and restoring as it has begun to fall apart substantially and is under the eye of a Restoration fundraiswr project, due to its historical significance.
    When talking to my Aunt about needing to get up close and inside the barn so I can get a good handful of really intensive photos, for a project Im doing, she stated that they ( aunt and uncle) are good friends with the family who owns it, and that if I come down to visit, theyd be really happy to let me do all the looking and photos I could possibly want.
    If you'd be interested in following up on this please feel free to contact me at thislonelyplanet68@gmail.com
    Cory.

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