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Thursday, April 11, 2013

SHEEP'S-FOOT






Sheep's-Foot

found at a construction site 





Patterns, shapes, and oddities can be humorous or startling subjects to photograph.  A Sheep's-Foot roller is rather an oddity. It compacts soil at construction sites. It was given its name after an observer commented that the pattern it left behind in the soil looked like a herd of sheep had passed by (RitchieWiki).








19 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness, that's so funny. At least to this city gal. Never would have guessed if I'd been asked what a sheepsfoot was!

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    1. Barbara -- My first response when I saw it was, "what is that," then, "how funny and yet unique." Up until this photo I had not really walked around a large working construction site and was quite taken with doing so. The funny thing was the very nice construction supervisor told me I would need to don a hard hat if I got any closer to the actual work. thanks Barbara

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  2. Dear Barbara,
    It is, from an abstract visual perspective, gorgeous! From a technological perspective, a brillant idea! It gives the impression that it is very heavy & powerful. When I worked with young children, I was always struck by thier love construction machines (diggers & dumpers). So I started noticing them as well, & admiring the work that their operators do. I love that you noticed this "gadget" in such a fresh way & learned its rather folksy name. Happy observing! Rita

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    1. Rita, It was fun taking this photo. The construction supervisor was so polite and told me the technicalities of using the sheep's-foot -- which is quite massive. You are right -- the world of technical equipment can be quite amazing and I could understand how children would be caught up in this amazement. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara




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  3. I never knew that...! Photography is teaching much more that just takin pics...

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    1. turquoisemoon -- Neither did I before yesterday. I agree photography teaches us so much besides how to take photos. Thanks -- barbara

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  4. Goodness! When I first saw this photo on my Blogger Dashboard, I thought, "Barbara's getting a bit carried away with aerating her lawn!" ;-)

    You'd think just a flat roller would do a better job of compacting soil than something that looks like an enormous pair of football cleats (or hair rollers!) Doesn't it just punch big holes in the ground? At any rate, it sure makes for a cool photo! The shadows really add a nice touch.

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    1. Laloofah -- Yes, it does resemble a thatcher for your lawn but it is larger and more massive. Well I was given a short lesson in compacting soil when building commercially (or residential) by the construction supervisor. In one sentence; soil is moved around so much that when it finally rests in its final spot it has to be compacted and tested with some kind of odometer to make sure the soil will not settle under the new buildings. You really wanted to know this???? I'm laughing as I write this. thanks -- barbara

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    2. I probably wanted to know that before they started building our new house, so where were you and your construction supervisor friend when I needed you? LOL

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  5. Interesting! I don't think I have ever witnessed one in action.

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    1. Michelle -- I liked it for its odd configuration and tones. Never had seen one before. thanks -- barbara

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  6. I have never seen anything like this! Today you have really taught me something new :-)

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    1. I don't imagine many folks see a sheep's-foot as it seems mostly used by commercial builders. I liked the coloration of the metal and the weird shapes -- just plain odd to me thanks -- barbara

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    1. Birdman -- Sure would hate to have of those run over my "foot." -- thanks -- barbara

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  8. I love old machinery that looks hand made. We saw some objects down in Mexico that really intrigued us. Terry bought a hand made juice press that I should photograph!

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    1. Hattie -- Old machinery seems to have wonderful character. Perhaps that is why you are drawn to it. I would be fascinated to see that juice press -- barbara

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  9. In my world, "sheep's-foot" was going to have something to do with fiber. But no, definitely unrelated to wool. Of course construction people would relate to what's on the ground rather than the sheep's coat. Funny how our perspective--are we above or below--shapes everything.

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    1. naomi -- I never thought that the name sheep's-foot could possibly be identified with the fiber field but it does seem likely now that you point it out. I suppose there are many names that can be misleading in online searches -- all part of the confusion our modern language can impart. thanks -- barbara

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