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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

KIRKSVILLE, KENTUCKY


Kirksville


You begin by driving west around a curve, past old garages, an empty antique house, a newer church and a few old  homes -- you are practically  to the other side of Kirksville within about three minutes. There is no chance you will miss the church's high white steeple and the large white wood building that once was a general store for folks. 


You will find the unincorporated village surrounded by 
farmland and some newer homes. You can continue driving west on this same road which leads you to the next little unincorporated village and then continuing leads you to the end --  the Kentucky River. Here the Kentucky River is meandering and rather untouched by our society.



Kentucky River


When I drive through a little place like Kirksville and the nearby areas,  I am reminded of Richard Dorson's words from his book,  American Folklore -- to paraphrase -- the people bond with the land through memories, ancestry and close family ties. His words run true in rural Central Kentucky. 



15 comments:

  1. Your description of the town was wonderful...and ending with running into the Kentucky River was perfect. Great photo of the river, by the way.

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    1. turquoisemoon -- thanks you for the nice comment. Small towns in Kentucky have an aura that resembles the old Andy Griffin show -- right down to the fishing poles. -- barbara

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  2. Something peaceful about it all.

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    1. Hattie -- After a week of horror in Boston I needed to undo my mental state so I headed out to a small town to absorb its peaceful ways. Maybe those feelings carried over into my post. thanks -- barbara

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  3. I recognize that kind of small, rural communities. We have them in abundance along our coast (and my parents came from two of them). Let us just hope they can stand up against the pressure driving people to the larger cities.

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    1. RuneE -- We too have that pressure of leaving the small towns for, usually, jobs in large cities. I have witnessed many small towns becoming practically ghost towns in this state as well as others in my travels. Your country looks wonderful -- so nice to see your photos of Norway -- barbara

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  4. Barbara, thank you for this small visit to Kentucky, the state where I was born...beautiful photos!

    I haven't been back there since I was a teenager and I am now in my 60's~

    Jan

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    1. Jan -- So you were born in Kentucky. I have only been here for about 5 years or so. Central Kentucky, where I live, grows on you. The Upland South of which Kentucky is a part has a culture that is all their own. I see by your posts that you are a lover of books and old barns. Kentucky is barn country as is the Midwest. Lets hope that we can keep these barns standing upright for a bit longer. A good organization is "Barn Aware." --- barbara

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  5. Sweet country road and town...the river looks a bit high in that picture, but isn't muddy looking like rivers around here get in the spring rains.

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    1. Barbara -- We have had a lot of rain in our area -- for most of April. The Kentucky River played an integral part during Kentucky's settlement era. Rivers fascinate me -- they are not only beautiful but so important to our eco-system. thanks -- barbara

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  6. Like that curve of the road in the first picture.

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    1. Haddock -- I visited your post and found it informative about India. I do like to know about the culture of other countries. Such beautiful architecture -- your elephant photos were great. -- barbara

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  7. I'm so glad you're giving me a chance to get to know more of Kentucky... Love these little towns...

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    1. Teresa -- I think that everywhere in our country we can find uniqueness -- differing in both "place" or with "other places," i.e. Minnesota alone or Minnesota vrs Santa Fe. They all tell a story of who we are. For me, now, I am finding great places in Central Kentucky. But I feel any place I visit (or live) I can find wonderful and surprising stories and visuals. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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    2. This is so true... Thank you for the reminder.

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