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Saturday, April 13, 2013

APPALACHIAN VERNACULAR FARMHOUSE




Standing on open Kentucky farmland, this mid to late 1800s Appalachian vernacular farmhouse appears abandoned but yet perhaps not?  It has signs of non-use but there could be other reasons for this. 






Here we have a pane missing from
 the window's six over six lights
 of its upper story window sash






Notice the two boarded up windows. What circumstances 
could be the cause of this farmhouse's forlorn look? 



28 comments:

  1. Don't you just wonder about the story???

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    1. I do. That is how I feel about many of the houses that I feel are on the "edge." -- thanks -- barbara

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  2. Love homes like this.....and using your imagination for the homes stories.....only if homes could talk....;).

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    1. Pam -- they are talking only I just can't figure it out. So I revert to my imagination -- thanks barbara

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  3. Perhaps the kids went off to college and never came back to the farm and as the older generations died, there was no one left to tend the old home place?

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    1. Florence -- Now that sounds like a plausible possibility. So many of the next generation walked away from farming. I did notice the grass looked mowed? -- thanks -- barbara

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  4. I found you in a unexpected and roundabout way! And I am so glad I did! I am enjoying your images and your blog so much!

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    1. pam -- thanks for stopping and leaving a nice comment. -- barbara

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  5. Every house has its own story. And I often wonder about what it is as well...:)

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    1. troutbirder -- one story I thought was that maybe someone still was living in the house. Some older person unable to fix or have fixed certain repairs around the house because of money and/or no family in the area. Some folks refuse to move from a home they have lived in most of their lives. Just a thought. thanks -- barbara

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  6. I would love to see what it looks like on the inside!

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    1. That is a feeling that many folks that love old houses want to do -- take a look inside. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  7. Oh, I love making up stories but I'll just make observations. That front entrance has an unexpected dignity with the "pillars" (or are they more properly called posts?) holding up the roof of the entry. My first surmise is that the house originally did not have that sheltering entry and a second generation added it to update. I also notice some windows have venetian blinds. I think that was once a stylish addition instead of "just" curtains. So my story would say the original home was either sold to newcomers or taken over by an heir when the original owners died and the second family spruced up the place. Then maybe they went bankrupt or other tragedies struck and the house was abandoned. They probably had once made improvements like running water and then-modern appliances which would have become outdated. Gee- I said I wouldn't make up a story and I just did. Can't help myself.

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    1. June -- Good story. The venetian blinds do look like the old ones that were around when I was young. Like the story of heirs taking over the house and sprucing it up. It was a house that would not require a zillion dollars to fix-up. It is quite large with good bones -- nice straight roof line and no sagging. along the foundation lines. The grass was mowed. I even wondered if some old person still lived in the house as they did not want to move from a home they had lived in for a long time? So many stories could be developed from this house as well as others we see on the landscapes of our country. Thanks -- barbara

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  8. Barbara...this wonderful place speaks to me so much. My heart aches for forgotten places...

    Jan

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    1. Jan -- Old houses can become useful again if given the chance -- perhaps this one is waiting for the right folks to come along?

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  9. In our area farms are sold in tact, or are kept in the family. The "old" farmhouse, such as this one, is left standing while a newer house is built on the acreage somewhere. Always sad to see a structure like this not being appreciated.

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    1. Michelle -- oh yes, I know what you are talking about. It is like the family wants a new place yet cannot bear to tear the old family house down so it sits there deteriorating over time. It does however give us a chance to still see the beauty in such old places although it might not be our way of handling it. thanks -- barbara

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  10. Great pics, as usual! I see so many lovely, lonely old houses that (if I had unlimited funds)I'd love to adopt and restore...

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    1. Vicki -- Money would do the trick. Would be lovely to see what you could do to all these all houses that stand so forlorn. thanks -- barbara

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  11. No love? No $$$$$$? No hands?

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    1. Birdman -- You have covered all the bases in a nutshell -- thanks barbara

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  12. How it remains standing is beyond me. Termites would have taken it long ago, if it were around here.

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    1. Hattie -- these old houses have great bones so they last almost forever. thanks for stopping -- barbara

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  13. Its usually economics or a could be a sad story. Maybe its lived its life and its us who feel the loss.

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    1. claggle -- Your comment that it could be economics or a sad story is what I thought when I first came upon this home. And yes it is evident that it led a life and yes, again, it is us who feel the loss. Your comment was very succinct and true in many ways -- thanks -- barbara

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  14. So many of these places look so forlorn and you grieve, or at least I do, for the people who had such dreams when they built or bought that house.

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    1. Tabor -- Since this house is about a hundred and fifty years old -- it probably has seen many joys and sorrows. Like claggle states in her comment above "maybe its lived its life and it us who feel the loss." thanks -- barbara

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