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Thursday, March 21, 2013

A BARN, A HORSE AND SPRING



A lovely red barn in Madison County.


Although yesterday was rather chilly and blustery, I felt that spring was in the air. I packed up my camera and hit the trail. Found lots of good material for my camera and talked with some of the country folks I met along the way. Southerns are some of the nicest folks. 


Today I even met a horse at one of my stops along a back-country road. It seems that horses are always interested in what I am doing when I stop by their pasture. Today this one was even giving me low sounding snorts -- whatever that means in horse language.


Got home late -- just as the sun was setting in a rosy colored sky. Soon it was dark and I heard a large flock of migrating Canadian geese flying overhead. I stepped out on my front porch and listened quietly to their honking as they flew north over my home.


A nice ending to a beautiful spring day. 





A beautiful spirited horse checking out what I'm doing with that black box I keep putting up to my face.



26 comments:

  1. Wonderful pics! Love that red barn. Very cold here in KC area plus snow and more expected...ugh!

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    1. turquoisemoon -- So KC is cold too. We are expecting snow early next week. Thanks for the nice comment on the photos. -- barbara

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  2. What a great picture Barbara, love the dramatic shape and colour of the barn. The earth is much lighter in shade than here, where it is a dark almost black peat. (Here being Fenland, East Anglia). Its all looking ready to go and grow here too.

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    1. claggle -- Your soil sounds wonderful for growing big lush gardens. As I was unfamiliar with Fenland, East Anglia I looked it up online. Beautiful place in the United Kingdom! The red barn is a common color is some areas -- not especially around here. The form though is common. Happy growing -- barbara

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  3. The call of the geese is such a pleasant reminder that weather is changing for warmer (or colder). There call always captures me. Great barn shot.

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    1. Tabor -- Nature provides us so many connections. The call of the Canadian Geese captures me also. It has so many innuendos -- thanks for your comments -- barbara

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  4. That is a RED barn -- stunning. And your horsey friend is handsome fellow. You must have had a really good day driving out and around.

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    1. June -- I have only seen a few red barns in this area. Usually they are black. Red barns were abundant in the area where I grew up as a child so I am rather nostalgic about them. The day was fun and relaxing with good folks and this horse -- thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  5. Looks like you are doing well with that black box in front of your face. Enjoy these two shots portraying Kentucky roadsides.

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    1. Grampy -- I discovered photography late so I have a lot of catching up to do. I sure do love to travel around and catch the local culture. There seems to be a clash between keeping some of the old and bringing in the new. thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  6. This sounds/looks like a really nice day. I'm looking forward to getting back out on back roads when the weather improves...

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    1. Teresa -- Very windy and very cold day but invigorating when the sun, for the most, peeked in and out. Sun seems to bring out the best in folks. The toughest part about riding the road for photos is the price of gas. thanks -- barbara

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  7. Ah, that gorgeous splash of red - how striking against that landscape! What an evocative photo. I'll bet that red barn is also very handsome when the field around it is deep green.

    Love the horse! What a beautiful creature. Horses can be so sociable and curious - and they so often seem to want to stick their whiskery schnozzles into a camera lens. :-) Your equine friend seems to be full of wild oats and vinegar on that blustery spring day!

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    1. Laloofah -- Red barns mean nostalgia to me. When I was young with four children one of their favorite places to play was our big red barn. Horses are such icons of strength to me. I respect them and must say I still have a bit of fear of them from a family injury years ago. But I do like to talk to them -- on the other side of the fence -- and also take photos of them. thanks -- barbara

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  8. That is one gorgeous horse! I am generally terrified of them but I sure like looking at them.

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    1. Birdie -- I thought the horse was gorgeous too. I understand your feelings about horses. I respect them greatly. I always like to visit with them from the other side of the fence. thanks for the comment - barbara

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  9. Spring day and wandering the country roads. Sounds wonderful. Loved the photographs.

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    1. NCmountainwoman -- All kinds of signs are out there that spring is definitely here. Summer is not my favorite so I try and get out now while the temps are nice. thanks -- barbara

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    1. Birdman -- Yes, I agree. -- thanks -- barbara

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  11. I just love country living! Can't wait 'til it warms up and I can get out and enjoy it more.

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    1. Janet -- I certainly can tell that you do like country living -- West Virginia is a beautiful state. I do like the chilly weather so I am in no rush for the hot summer ahead. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  12. Nice to see that spring still exists - horse and all. Some Arctic high-pressure is giving us very nice, dry weather - but at winter temperatures. Luckily no snow.

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    1. RuneE -- I imagine that your winter temps remain much longer than ours resulting in a later arrival of spring? Just the thought of an Artic high-pressure makes me feel cold -- but nice -- dry and no snow. thanks -- barbara

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  13. Hello, Barbara! I've been away from the blog world, so I will catch up with your posts that I've missed. How I love that sense of spring that you describe! I felt your sense of joy & expansion. I don't like to generalize, but I remember being greeted warmly by southerners at a Folklife Festival in Washington DC years ago: The featured state was Tennessee. I do think there is more of a reserve here in New England.
    A picture book for you: That Book Woman by Heather Henson, based on the Pack Horse Librarians' history. For a video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTZd31qetmY Henson's personal story in Kentucky is great too.
    Your horse encounter reminds me of one I had a year ago, in France (it's in a blog post). So nice to share some of that spring energy with a lovely horse. And so nice of YOU to share that energy with us here.
    Thanks, Rita

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    1. Hello Rita -- Just viewed That Book Woman. What a sweet and tender portrayal of folks in the south. Actually, one can still hear that dialect when out on the back country roads. Quite common in the eastern part of the state. I find it charming.

      I attended a Folklife Festival in D.C. many years ago and was so impressed with it all. Its main focus was India with all its colors, materials and music. A second side feature was the Cajun culture mostly with music and dance.

      I know spring is here in Kentucky -- even though we have had light snowfalls recently. The spring bird songs are very prevalent and the trees are budding -- we have had lots of moisture so should have a lovely spring.

      May you, way up in the north country, soon enjoy your spring.

      Thanks for your nice comment. -- barbara

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