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Sunday, March 17, 2013

A HISTORIC KENTUCKY PLANTER'S HOME

The original one story vernacular Federal home that was later 
enlarged with a Greek Revival
 two-story home addition.

When I landed here in Kentucky I felt like I was in another land. I arrived from a long stint in the areas of  New Mexico and Oregon and found that the architecture here was so different. In fact different from any place I had lived such as the Midwest and the far West. Since part of my background includes Historic Preservation, my eyes couldn't get enough of  Kentucky's old building stock.

One of the houses that initially stood out was this early 1800s home. I call it a "planter's home." It is very historic --  it sits alone on a hill overlooking a large parcel of land.  Although I have lived in the area for a few years I  have never seen any signs of occupancy. 


The original one-story home with two-story home attached


I would love to open one of the doors and take my own personal tour of the interior. But this is not to be. It is not a house that folks can walk the grounds or open the doors. It just stands there holding secrets in its own private memories.

Even the few locals I asked about the house didn't really know anything.


Front facade of the two-story house 
with portico entrance porch


Close-up of front portico Greek Revival porch


Obviously this was the home built by wealth. I recently found out that the one-story house was originally owned by Joseph Miller, the son of the founder of Richmond, Kentucky. Another family member owned it by 1850 when the tw0-story house became part of the one-story. 

Named "Hedgeland" from my research online -- could not find out why it was called this.

These photos are five years old. There is probably  more information in other archives but for now it might have to wait awhile before I get back to it again. 

I wrote this post today as I felt that I owed it to the home.

Sometimes a certain place or places can grab you with questions and this was one of those places for me.

25 comments:

  1. I can imagine that this place rang all your bells! What beauty, mystery and history envelope it. I'm just bewildered that a place like this would sit abandoned for so long. I know it would take big $ to fix up, but it still makes no sense to me. Surely entity would have come along by now with the means and desire to rescue this property? Unless it's not for sale - and that, too, is a mystery.

    I wish you could have poked around inside, or found out more about it. Yet I also kind of like her enigmatic, sphinx-like mystery, too. At any rate, the photos are evocative and lovely, and this post honors her graciously!

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    1. Laloofah -- This old place really is in fairly good shape considering its age. My thoughts are not the best for this old place. It is located in the country along the perimeter of Richmond which is a bustling town. This land has to be worth quite a bit. It could be already bought by a developer??? The location and land is ideal for a housing development. When I lived in the Midwest developers would buy up huge farms, let the farm house sit until they were ready to build and then the farm house was torn down. Sometimes these bought out farms would sit for several years with the house aging until development started. Don't know if this is the case with this home and land. Perhaps there are other reasons -- lets hope so. thanks -- barbara

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    2. I sure hope that's not the situation!

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    3. P.S. I just happened upon this site and thought it would appeal to you, if you're not already aware of it... I haven't explored it much yet, but the first several photos look like ones you might have taken...

      Natural Decor

      Hope you enjoy!

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  2. Love your pics of these grand old places and appreciate the difficulty in getting them...great job!

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    1. turquoisemoon -- Yes, taking photos out in the country or even the towns can sometimes be a bit difficult as you know. The rough part, sometimes, is that when you go home and load them up on our computer we find that none of them are good! But overall, I feel that it really is pleasurable to get out among all these buildings and folks. thanks -- barbara

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  3. Despite its lack of occupancy, it has held up well. Like you, I would love to see inside of this house. I would like to imagine that it has a lot of the original interior features left.

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    1. Michelle -- When I was a very young women I loved to truck around the countryside and find vacant old houses. We would walk through the houses without even thinking that this was private property. While inside I always admired the old built-ins and the beautiful trims. I have a feeling that this house has lots or original features inside. thanks -- barbara

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  4. I do like red brick old homes and some of the homes here follow that style. btw Baron the GSD gets lots of publicity on Troutbirder, spring, summer and fall. Unfortunately for him I hunker down in my couch potato mode in winter and he misses the long nature hikes....He's not happy with me these days.

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    1. troutbirder -- Baron is one handsome dog. German Shepards are one of my very favorite dogs. I have had a couple and loved them all. I look forward to seeing Baron in the spring. I know dogs get rather restless when you break up their routine. My daughter is a dog-walker in Utah and all those folks that don't get out in the winter to walk their dogs hire her as she takes them on long mountain hikes.

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  5. Thank you for showing us this house, it has great dignity and surely fascinating stories that, perhaps, are lost forever.

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    1. June -- thanks for the comment about the old house. Unfortunately I do not have time to research only a small bit of history on the old houses I run across. As I only do quick researches, I sometimes don't even find out anything on a certain house or building. No matter if I find zero info or a little it is all so very interesting to me. -- barbara

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  6. If I passed it often in my travels, I have many questions too. I bet it carries a lot of stories. No owners about?

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    1. Birdman -- Living in an old house like you tell us about -- I imagine you would like this house -- thanks -- barbara

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  7. I have linked to you at Fly's Picture Place. We have a lot in common and I very much like what I've seen here.

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    1. One Fly -- thanks for the link -- and also the nice comment. Read many of your posts on Fly's Picture Place and enjoyed -- barbara

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  8. Old houses have their story to tell, both visual and otherwise - If you are willing to look and listen. You obviously are.

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    1. RunE -- Taking photos of these old houses is something that intrigues me. Like you said they have stories to tell. However, the only stories to hear are those that are drawn out from their remaining shadows. Thanks -- barbara

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  10. What a beautiful old house! Houses like this are rare in my county but just over the state line in Tennessee there are many like this.

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    1. Vicki -- I have notice quite a few in my area -- but I have also noticed a few that have been torn down lately. I wonder what the Central Kentucky landscape looked like 50 years ago? thanks -- barbara

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  11. What a beautiful, historic home, Barbara. With your background, I can see how it would attract you! Moving to a new region gives one such a fresh, open perspective...a child's curiosity & openness, I think. Thank you for sharing what you see, R.

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    1. Hello Rita -- New horizons do give an individual new perspectives, I think. I do believe that one can find this in a rock as well as a landscape. All a perspecitve with their own story. There is so much to see around us. thanks -- barbara

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  12. Once again you remind me of images taken years ago, photos that have stayed with me. Will have to dig through my stuff and find ones from North Carolina. Abandoned tobacco barns, still standing, weathering. Wonder if they are so powerful because they'd been allowed to decay. Like you I wonder how long we allow remnants in space--before the inevitable taking down, replacing with something unconnected to the past.

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    1. naomi -- I have never been to Europe. My visions of it have been through film and photography. Based on this it seems that they have a strong regard for their built environment and preserve it. I wonder what is it about our country that we are in such a rush to tear down and rebuild?

      I believe folks in photography find the decaying buildings powerful as they know in our country they disappear and along with that our individual ideals. Just my thoughts.-- thanks barbara

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