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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

MAKING HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES

A farmer runs the the New Holland 634 baler turning the cut field grass into large round bales of hay that one sees stored in barns or drying out in farmer's fields.

"Making hay while the sun shines," is an old traditional phrase that grew out of our agricultural past. In these two photos, above and below, are two farmers busy at work mechanically making  large round bales of hay.


It is a sunny day and the two men are very busy taking the opportunity to do the work while conditions are dry. 




Working as a team of two farmers - while one is baling the second farmer is spiking each produced round bale on the back of his tractor then heading toward the barn to place it in storage.

Some round bales can weigh up to one thousand pounds. They are used mostly for winter feed for domestic farm animals. 

Round bales have become inviting for photographers. Even I cannot resist stopping to photograph them.




16 comments:

  1. I particularly like that last photo. In Oklahoma they bale hay in air-conditioned cabs it's so hot.

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    1. Rubye -- This was a small farming operation. That is probably why they use sun tarps and small tractors to do their field work. I imagine those AC cab type tractors are quite expensive. I think mechanized farming has a down side as well as an up side. thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  2. My father had an old fashioned baler--rectangular bale--when the round bales came in, they looked weird, exotic and unwieldy as they couldn't be stored in neat brick-like piles. But they are easy to unroll in a winter pasture for the cattle. Your pictures have a nostalgia-inducing feeling.

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    1. June -- You have lived on both side on the universe, so to speak. A rural farm life and a big city life. Now a life of personal choosing near the ocean. This gives you such great balance to your life as it glows from your posts. Liked your bit of personal farm life history. And thanks for the photos comment. - barbara

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  3. Some fine round bale captures indeed...

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    1. Raining Iguanas -- Bet you see lots of round bales in your NY rural area. Thanks for stopping -- barbara

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  4. I find them so beautiful when I see them resting in a field. I don't know what it is about them dotting the landscape. I love those golden swirls.

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    1. Michelle -- I know that you have plenty of round bales in your part of KY. I liked your last photo of them sitting in a field. thanks for the comment -barbara

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  5. I love seeing those giant round bales of hay in the fields. Great photographs.

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    1. NCmountainwoman -- I have thought about doing a photo study of different fields and barns that have round bales. I pass so many fields and barns that have them - each one has a different portrait to offer.
      thanks - barbara

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  6. BF makes both round and square. says the right handed typer

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    1. turquoisemoon - I appreciate your comment more than ever now that I know about you breaking your hand -- thanks -- barbara

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  7. It's something to see that huge baler after being on the Peruvian altiplano, where there is almost no agricultural machinery. What we don't take for granted!

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    1. Hattie - We do have many industrial mechanisms compared to other countries of the world. Hopefully we keep our industrialization in balance with nature. A huge topic. thanks - barbara

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  8. I recently saw a round bale spray-painted orange like a big pumpkin, with eyes, nose and mouth. It was a hoot.

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    1. Nature Weaver -- Now that is clever. What a wonderful old tradition to place decorations of pumpkins, scarecrows, skeletons, black cats etc around our homes, schools and businesses. This is my favorite time of the year. -- thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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