.

.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

APPALACHIAN SMOKE SHOP



This store is located along a well traveled route. It appears that they offer every type of cigarette or cigar that one could desire. They even have a sign that says, "make your own and save." Below are sad statistics on smoking  for Kentucky folks:

Smoking Attributable Adult (35+ Years) Mortality
National Average = 248.5 per 100,000
The average annual smoking-attributable mortality rate in Kentucky for 2000 to 2004 was 370.6 per 100,000.

Statistics provided by the 
Center for Disease Control and Prevention.


19 comments:

  1. I wonder if there is a law, or rule of some sort, that smoke shops must display those statistics. The stats are a good idea even thought it probably doesn't discourage purchases. The roll your own seems to be fairly popular. A gas station/convenience store near-by where I live has had such a sign out for a year or two.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. June -- Kentucky was one of the largest if not the largest producer nationwide of tobacco at one time. Unfortunately, tobacco smoking seeped into the traditional ways of the state during that time and still remains to a large extent. Stats confirm that young folks are the largest user of tobacco in KY. Interesting that you had a "roll your own sign" near you. I think you are right, the stats really don't seem to discourage folks from smoking. But I do know smoking really gets you in its clutches as I was a smoker 30 years ago. Giving it up was tough.

      Delete
  2. Barbara, this brings back memories. When I was a little girl, both my dad and brother smoked cigarettes. We had a rolling machine, and I rolled the cigarettes with Prince Albert tobacco. Then I sold the homemade cigs to my dad and brother. Can't remember how much I charged, but it was probably something like five for a penny. That perhaps would qualify as my first job! Thanks for stirring up my past.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nature Weaver -- How interesting. I have never seen a rolling machine. I thought rolling a cigarette was done by hand. You were a young business woman for sure. thanks for stopping by -- barbara

      Delete
  3. I remember rolling machines from the 70's. Ah well...
    I think the only thing that truly dissuades people from smoking is social pressure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rubye -- I believe you are right -- social pressure can do it. My social pressure came from my four children who put the squeeze on me. As a result I quit 30 years ago. thanks for the comment -- barbara

      Delete
  4. Why isn't tobacco regulated like the addictive drug it is?

    I never smoked but watched my mother-in-law die miserably of smoking-induced emphysema --so I'm a little prejudiced against smoking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vicki -- It is not regulated because of the tobacco company lobbyists. Like the liquor industry, they would lose billions if their product was restricted. These industries feed off death I think.

      Delete
  5. It's a den of death but the photo is great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marcia -- Yes, it is the den of death. Amazing how such products that can cause death are given such status in our commercial culture.- barbara

      Delete
  6. It seems like different world to me. It's very colourful, but if you want to reduce mortality from smoking pure information is not enough. Price increases, reduced access and ban on advertizing are the stating points. Even we in Europe have understood that (and many in the US, too).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RunE - Cigarettes are expensive in the U.S. but this has not stopped folks from continuing to smoke. I think your suggestion of reduced access and a ban on advertising are good. thanks for stopping by - barbara

      Delete
  7. Haven't seen a smoke shop in years! I was surprised when we moved back to NC and saw the smokeless tobacco so heavily advertised at the gas stations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. NCmountainwoman -- From the various states I have lived in it is my personal observation that the southern states seem to push smoking more than our other states and reading through the CDC's stats I would say that my observation holds true -- barbara

      Delete
  8. I was surprised to note that people don't smoke much in Peru. Any insights?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hattie -- That is a very good question. Out of curiosity I looked up some info online. Peru is lower than the US -- they have a population of 10% smokers and we are at 24%. This was info from a Gallop poll taken in 2007. The poll went on to say, " there appears to be no consistent relationship between the prevalence of smoking in a country and its location or its residents' relative wealth." thanks for the inquisitive comment -- barbara

      Delete
    2. I think it might be because of the widespread use of coca leaves for chewing, candy bars, and tea.

      Delete
  9. Fascinating comments you smoked out (sorry) here. Like RunE, am convinced it takes draconian pressure to limit smoking. New York City was transformed by Mayor & Health Commissioner moves--banned in restaurants, bars, stores. It was a shock to move to Portland, Or, home of sustainability/local food,movement/biking, and be awash in smoke outside Portland State U. buildings. Currently there's a new move on to deal with this. We'll see.

    Early 1970s, a reformed 2-pack a day user, made an effort by removing ashtrays which always filled during women's org meetings in my home. Ever heard of women using cuffs on pants for ashes? When Surgeon General announced second-hand smoke harmful to others, put a No Smoking sign on front door. That worked!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. naomi -- You like I are reformed for good. We have taken the test of time to prove it. No, I had not seen cuffs used for ash trays. Your No Smoking sign worked well. a friend of mine put a similar sign on her door and lost a smoking friend. Oh Well -- one does have some say about their own house. thanks for the good comments -- barbara

      Delete