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Tuesday, June 19, 2012

CONTROVERSIAL CONFEDERATE FLAG


About ten miles from where I live is the above barn with its hanging large confederate flag. A rural area. In the South it is not unusual to ride past a private home and or a private building that has a confederate flag displayed for public view. Sometimes even a truck has a confederate flag on a pole jammed into its back cargo area -- flying with the breeze as it rides along a road. 


Some say the flag represents history.


I say bull-shit to this.


I feel that it represents extremism. Especially racism.


This flag represents the part of South that I do not like.

33 comments:

  1. I totally agree, racism is alive and well. Perhaps announcing the view with a Confederate flag is semi-acceptable in the Southern states, but it is not confined to that part of the USA.

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    1. Well June, this is my second attempt on leaving a comment. Lost the first attempt. I believe that isms are still very evident in the U.S. Some covert and some overt. I consider the Confederate flag a sign of overt bigotry. Why? Legal precedents have established it to represent extremism and have had flags removed from governmental buildings. Of course private homes and business are allowed to fly the flag as it is a part of our free speech.-- barbara

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  2. Racism is alive in all areas of this country and so is the mentality that goes with that flag. As a grandmother of a biracial granddaughter, I find it sad and embarrassing... BTW, love your pics on your other post. Very fun!!!

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    1. turquoisemoon -- I agree that racism along with extremism has many issues alive and well in all parts of the country. I have lived in the West, North, and South. I have visited the East many times. The South is the only area that I have witnessed where so many Confederate flags are displayed. Like you say -- it is a sad and embarrassing. -- barbara

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  3. Ongoing discussion of people's pride in this flag. There's a huge one at an intersection of two interstate highways that apparently the Sons of the Confederacy have raised in Tampa. My view is to try to see that these folks want to remember the other things they were fighting to save in the Confederacy, and not slavery. Slavery has become the catchall issue representing the Civil War, and I don't think it was the only thing they gave their lives over. (Yes, racism is still awful and active, whether with this flag or just covert)

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    1. Do you think there is another way that the Sons of Confederacy can address remembering what they fought for? Another question -- can the country come together under one flag, after all the Civil War ended 147 years ago? thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. Agree with what you say there, Barbara.

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  5. It is ironic that these are also the people who parade themselves around as being the real American patriots!

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    1. I believe in diversity but I feel this is out of line -- barbara

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  6. I agree. Around here they go hand in hand with racism. Sad.

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    1. Rubye -- they do go hand in hand with racism. Who are these racists trying to kid by saying the flag represents the south's history. thanks -- barbara

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  7. So sad that this dark part of history continues, in our own country of Australia, too; sometimes by Bogans (rednecks) adopting the Eureka Flag which represented the Miners Uprising against overbearing, greedy authority not the racist, xenophobic bulls**t these people spout today.

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    1. Jayne -- I do believe that extremism which includes racism, is a global issue. Your country appears to have the same extremist types of people that I see and read about that live in all areas of this wonderful earth. thanks -- barbara

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  8. I see it a bit around my part of KY. I don't like it. At all.

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    1. Michelle, I have seen it more in Kentucky than any state I have lived in. I find it sad and frightening for the people it is directed at in KY. thanks -- barbara

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  9. Interesting blog, Barbara. We live in a small, Midwest town. A young bi-racial couple moved in across the street from us. Shortly thereafter, a guy from Georgia moved in to the house next door to the couple. Within days, a Confederate flag was attached to the side of the house closest to the couple. When my husband and I saw that, it about made us sick. We're not used to seeing that in the Midwest.

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    1. Nature Weaver -- your personal account of the flag display in your Midwest neighborhood is alarming. I lived a good part of my life in the Midwest and never experienced such an extreme display as you talk about with the actions of your new Georgia neighbor. thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  10. I am so sad, and frankly a little mad, to see racism still running rampant in this country. I simply cannot understand generations of such entrenched hatred. Thank you for calling it what it is: bull shit.

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    1. Teresa -- The flag bearers apparently never give up their generations of hatred. It's a learned behavior from those that influenced them from their past. The flag bearers are very arrogant at showing their ignorance. -- thanks -- barbara

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  11. As soon as I clicked on your blog and saw the flag my hackles went up. Being from Canada I do not know as much of America's history as I should. Isn't flying a confederate flag akin to flying a swastika? How can this be a part of history that anyone wants to remember or acknowledge? I don't know. The world is an odd place.

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    1. Birdie -- In many folks eyes, flying the confederate flag is akin to displaying the swastika. A better analogy, for me, is that it's akin to wearing the white sheet of the Klu Klux Klan. -- thanks -- barbara

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  12. May I add an Amen to Barbara's last comment. Will the time ever arrive when we Americans can move forward in the direction our forefathers intended. No one alive right now is personally responsible for the wrongs of the past. Let's hope and pray that open minds and loving hearts can see all of us for who we are.....the one and the same. Thank you.

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    1. Nature Weaver -- Complicated world right now. -- thanks -- barbara

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  13. Barbara,
    I don't often disagree with you but I think the attitude of distrust of those proud of this flag is lumping all in one group. Raised in the north but having lived in the south most of my life. My brother-in-laws loved this flag and would display it more as a symbol of pride in the area they grew up in. Pride in the south. Pride in Kentucky. I have never met any individuals as unracist as my brother-in-laws. My brother-in-laws excepted me when I moved down to this neck of the woods. Even if I was a damn Yankee. Sure there are some that may display it with racist intent but I feel it is unfair to assume all have that intent. If I put myself in my brother-in-laws shoes I would be proud of the symbol of the south as they are.

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  14. Grampy -- I appreciate your heartfelt comments. It is alright to disagree with me. Symbols can change within a culture bringing contentious feelings among its citizenry. The third Reich symbol meant extremism under Hitler. That same symbol was used (prior to Hitler) as a sign of friendship by Native Americans. So I believe that flags with certain symbols have different meanings in the mind of the beholder. Interpretation of flag symbols are reflections of the culture. For many in the U. S. and around the round the Confederate flag has become an insignia for extremism. This is how I interpret it, I did not invent its meaning of extremism, it has become so as the country has evolved. Its symbolism now represents a dark period in the history of our country. When I see it displayed in such a public manner it sends chills up my spine. So, it is not a matter of disagreeing or agreeing, it is all about what you believe.

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    1. Barbara,
      True it is about what you believe. Having once felt as you do about confederate flag wavers, knowledge of folks that view this flag as simply southern pride changed my perception. Looking for another example I think of folks that get tattoos. Defacing ones body is repulsive to me but it would be extreme I think for me to automatically reject anyone with a tattoo. I do value your beliefs and it would be interesting to find out the view of the individual that hung the flag from that barn. The picture of the barn is great and enhanced by the colors and shapes of the flag if I only view it as artistic.

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    2. The best thing about this subject is that you and I can have a civil discussion. I'm all for civility. thanks -- barbara

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    3. How true and you are welcome.

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    4. Amen Grampy! I am married to a Yankee and she is a true blessing. She is very supportive and I love her to death! I will defend her against anyone! :-)

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  15. We have that kind of persons over here too. I share your views.

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    1. RuneE -- thanks for your comment -- a thorny issue in many parts of the world I believe -- barbara

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  16. I must disagree. The flag has been used by racists, unfortunately. But so has the current US flag. This flag that is condemned as racist has had other ethnicities and nationalities fight under it. Hard to believe? There were were Jewish, Hispanic, Cherokee, Choctaw and even African American men who fought and died fighting for "that" flag. Want proof? Look at the company musters and rolls of the Richmond Howitzers. Look at Albert Pike's company muster and rolls. This can be researched and proven in the Library of Congress as well as archived Northern and Southern newspapers. This flag never flew over a slave ship because this flag was not in existence until the war. It was the US flag that flew over the slave ships. It was the US flag that flew for the soldiers who slaughtered thousands of Native Americans, not the Confederate flag. Mr. HK Edgerton, former head of the Asheveille, NC NAACP travels the country promoting the flag and its history. Was slavery the cause of the War?

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