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Tuesday, September 6, 2011

COMMUNITY THREADS IN RICHMOND


I like to ride up and down side streets which run at right angles to old commercial districts and take photographs. One town where I like to ride the roads is Richmond, Kentucky -- finding a rich diverse stock of vintage residential architecture.

Here the housing stock is eclectic in its originality.  Streets bubble up with old residential homes. All shapes and sizes, some appear to have original exteriors while others have new vinyl siding and windows. No harm, vinyl can easily be removed if a person wants to restore. Overall, the residential landscape along the streets is more vintage in appearance than up-dated.

In the photos above and below are two homes I spotted close to each other on one of the streets. These homes had been up-dated with modern vinyl siding and newer doors but still had the old original archtectural trim decorating their porches. 

The porch's trim illuminates not only the home, but contributes to the historic ambiance of the neighborhood -- architectural pieces are the threads of a fabric that represents community

Fabric threads weave community.



18 comments:

  1. Hello Barbara:
    Personally, we are always rather sad to see UPVC replacements for what would have been wooden doors or windows. How very pretty the porch decoration looks and such a pity, in our view, that the door was not refurbished in the style and material of the original.

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  2. Barbara,
    It is interesting to me that you were drawn to the porch details. Two years ago we visited my son in in his apartment in an old section of Louisville. I walked and photographed all the detail work put in to the porches and stoops. Some with fish scale patterns above the porches. This finish work missing from modern housing. I don't like cities much but I too was drawn to the ambiance the trim created.

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  3. I love the way the second house has painted their trim. I am currently totally intrigued by the "painted lady" Victorian houses. Who would have thought that such a repressed society would have such gaudy homes. Maybe that's why they're so gaudy, because it was one of the few ways that they could let their inner joy show.

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  4. I love all this beautiful detail work. People took more pride in their dwellings than they do now.

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  5. I love old houses! We have a neighborhood here that is designated as 'historic' and residents are encouraged to restore their homes. Not everyone does but it's a lovely area and I would love to have a home there.

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  6. June and Lance -- I too feel that an old historic door would keep the integrity of the house. Perhaps the present owners were not fortunate to have the original door as I figure the house to be around a hundred years old -- many owners could have passed through this place. You have a great appreciation for the authentic -- we need people like you to keep these old houses standing. -- barbara

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  7. Grampy -- I have only driven through Louisville -- but I was astounded by their historic buildings. You should post some of the photos you took while there. Sure would be interesting to see them. Thanks -- barbara

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  8. Louise -- Yes the painted ladies exude joy in their colorful appearance. San Francisco is loaded with them. I visited there and was surprised at the number of Victorian homes in the city -- they're beautiful.-- barbara

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  9. Mama-Bug -- we would be hard pressed to find a finish carpenter that could design and install such beautiful work. There are a few around still but not many -- they are very expensive too. I think folks would be unwilling to pay for such work today and therefore the labor pool to accomplish such work is small and only for the folks with the money. thanks -- barbara

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  10. Kay -- I just know you should move into an old house. Or even an old apartment in a vintage building. I think you would love the workmanship of the place. -- barbara

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  11. I love the painted trim of the second photo. It adds such personality to the porch.

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  12. It is so refreshing to see a variety of styles and sizes. I hate some of the subdivisions in which one of three or four house plans are used for every house in the community.

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  13. Farmchick -- I do like the last photo's trim the best too. Thanks -- barbara

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  14. NCmountainwoman -- Didn't think about that when I was writing this post -- but yes that "same size fits all" for house and lot can make one cringe sometimes -- unless it's built with a lot of mature trees, plantings etc around it, thanks -- barbara

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  15. I enjoy your blog so much each time I visit. The photographs are wonderful. You capture such a marvelous view of country life, slowness and beauty. Thank you. It really makes me feel happy every time.

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  16. Gaea -- You say such kind words -- thank you. I visited your post about your new cottage house. You are very fortunate to not only have an old cottage house but so many gorgeous plants surrounding it. Sometimes older folks are afraid to reach out and find a new abode thinking they are too old to start over again in a new environment. You show how refreshing it can be. -- barbara

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  17. I love the pretty trim on both houses, but the second one (#108) is my absolute favorite! I not only love that they painted the trim in different colors, but the colors they chose as well! So handsome! I hope you can take another drive through that neighborhood when they've got their Christmas decorations up! :-)

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  18. Laloofah -- Hey that is a great idea to take photos of neighbors with Christmas lights on. Would be fun if quite a few bloggers participated.I've never tried to take xmas lights in the dark -- I wonder how it would turn out. Thanks for your comments -- barbara

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