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Friday, June 24, 2011

TREE WISDOM


Our roots anchor us to the land as does roots for a tree. Rootedness is a testament to  wisdom within a tree as it is also to ourselves. It settles our inner being -- it survives  storms,  winds,  pollution, and human disruption. 


Roots can be complex. They can be entrenched. Yet remember that sunshine produces a tree -- as it also produces us. 


No matter how you germinate in life -- with scars, with tangled roots, with love, with spirituality -- wisdom grows. Like the tree.

22 comments:

  1. So True! I love the picture of the tree roots. Don't know that I have ever seen roots like that...so complex. Must be a wise tree. Or must be a wise collection of trees given how is looks like many trees have come together in community with one another...kinda like a tight knit family.

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  2. Darcy -- Excellent observation on the trees being a tight family. That observation can be made in many human families as well don't you agree. Thanks for the nice comments about the post -- barbara

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  3. I love trees! One of the things I like best about my neighborhood is the trees!!!!

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  4. Excellent post! Love the comparisons, the depth of the roots within us aids in withstanding the many trials that we endure... always to return to our roots a little bit stronger.

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  5. Kay -- I agree with you, trees really do make a fine neighborhood. Your home state of Ohio has wonderful trees. -- thanks for stopping -- barbara

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  6. Reflections -- Thank you for the nice comments on my post. You caught the meaning in my writing very well. -- barbara

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  7. An excellent photo and some really wise words as well.

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  8. Thought you'd like the pic of the Moreton Bay Fig Tree roots HERE.

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  9. Jayne -- What a fabulous tree -- unaware that they existed. Did a bit of online research after I received your comment and found that there is one located in Santa Barbara, California in the U.S. -- Australian origin. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  10. Farmchick -- Thanks for the comment on the photo.Found the root photo at a park near where I live. -- barbara

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  11. Love that gnarly web of tree roots! And though I have plenty of tumbling tumbleweed in me, I can also totally relate to the rootedness you describe in your lovely little essay. And trees are indeed very wise with much to teach us!

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  12. Laloofah -- Just think of all the oxygen trees give us. They sustain us in a natural way and yes teach us too. -- barbara

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  13. Those roots definitely make a statement. Great photo Barbara.

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  14. Although I am exceedingly fond of trees (my dad worked for the US Forest and Soil Conservation Services) I hate the sight of exposed roots as shown in your photo. I would bet anything this is one of those pesky maple trees, perhaps a silver maple? As a gardener, I find some trees obnoxious and others good citizens.

    Exposed roots on hillsides spell erosion and exposed roots on creek banks might mean a flood has passed by. Hope I don't sound too negative, but I like roots in their place, underground. Dianne

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  15. Dianne -- Perhaps there is another way for one to look at the silver maple. One is that silver maples are native to the eastern part of the country. They are not meant to be landscape plants rather woodland plants. They produce the largest seeds of native maples that are an important source of food for birds and small animals -- squirrels feed heavily on the buds and beavers feed on the bark and cut stems. The exposed roots are its way of getting much needed oxygen of which they would expire without it. My post tree photo was taken in a woodlands setting. Thanks for your input -- barbara

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  16. MamaBug -- Check out the Moreton Bay Fig Tree on Jayne's comment above for a fantastic rooted tree. thanks barbara

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  17. Beautiful post. You know I especially loved it.

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  18. Roots are revealing in humans and trees.

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  19. When I was younger a Swiss friend complained that I showed signs of rootlessness. I replied that roots are for trees, not human beings.

    I have not entirely changed my mind, but agree that she had a point.

    I love tracing the roots of trees.

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  20. Frisko -- Your friend sounds like he was talking metaphorically. -- barbara

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  21. Tess -- You leave the nicest comments -- barbara

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  22. Birdman -- Very astute observation -- barbara

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