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Sunday, June 19, 2011

RILKE AND FLOWERS


ChicoryField
WILD CHICORY FLOWERS

See the flowers, so faithful to Earth.
We know their fate because we share it.
Were they to grieve for their wilting,
that grief would be ours to feel . . .

If you could enter their dreaming and dream with them deeply,
you would come back different to a different day,
moving so easily from that common depth.

Or maybe just stay there: they would bloom and welcome you,
all those brothers and sisters tossing in the meadows,
and you would be one of them.

 Sonnets to Orpheus by Rainer Maria Rilke,
 In Praise of Mortality by Anita Barrows & Joanna Macy

Daylillies2011RoccastleCounty
WILD DAYLILIES


23 comments:

  1. I love Rilke and his words are apt for these photos!

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  2. What beautiful photos, and what a beautiful poem! I love Rilke, but was not familiar with this one. I especially love the last stanza. The poem reminded me of a recent photo challenge my friend Sue participated in, where she had to take photos from the point of view of a flower. I think she did a nice job!

    The wild chicory flowers are especially pretty, I love that shade of blue. They resemble (in color at least) the blue flax that has just begun blooming here. Isn't it wonderful, all this verdant, perfumed, blooming beauty? :-)

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  3. Kay -- thanks for the nice comment -- I agree, Rilke is great -- barbara

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  4. Ronda - Such nice words from you -- barbara

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  5. Laloofah -- Yes, blue flax is so beautiful. Chicory is along the same color hue. Did you ever make coffee from the chicory root?

    Visited your friend's blog and thought it was wonderful. Her photos were well composed.

    Thanks -- barbara

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  6. Gorgeous colors in these photographs and great words to go with them.

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  7. Farmchick -- Rilke touches me with his connection to nature -- thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  8. All of the fields and roadsides around here (just outside of Philadelphia) are filled with orange daylilies right now too. You called the daylilies wild which to me means native. As I understand it, according to the professional plant people, these orange daylilies are actually naturalized, having escaped gardens and such after having been brought over from East Asia. Semantics really...to me, anything living out of the bounds of conventional captivity is wild- whether it is the mind being allowed to learn in freedom out of the confines of industrial schooling or the artist creating what her mind sees in her studio. Wild means to flourish unencumbered, out of bounds- just like the daylilies you featured.

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  9. No, I haven't made coffee from chicory root, but we buy Teeccino and Dandy Blend, which both contain it (among other good things!) :-)

    Thanks for visiting Sue's post, I'm glad you enjoyed it!

    And I keep meaning to tell you I really like your new profile photo!

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  10. Your combination of photos with the poem is perfect, Barbara. The entrance to summer is lined with blues, oranges, yellows, reds and many shades of green.

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  11. Love the photos. Chickory can be so beautiful. I am amazed at how some of Nature's arrangements work.

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  12. LOve the blue flowers. Sometimes Nature is amazing. Dianne

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  13. Darcy -- to use your fine terms -- wild to me means to "flourish unencumbered." Be they native or non-native plants, they often escape beyond the limits of their boundaries and florish. I know the daylily is not native nor is chicory. Both have found freedom in our fields and roadsides. And I am thankful that they have as they give us such delight with their tossing heads of bright blossoms. I appreciate your discussion of wildness -- barbara

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  14. Laloofah -- Thanks for the info on the coffee. I do drink an organic blend locally. I would like to try and make chicory coffee someday -- from scratch. Digging the roots and drying then processing into coffee. Thanks for the comment on my new photo. -- barbara

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  15. Dianne -- I think nature is always amazing. We are but one small segment of it that gets to experience her infinite beauty. The wildness of our world is full of wonder. Thanks Dianne -- barbara

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  16. Tess -- Rilke works wonders with words. He is so nature connected. Thanks -- barbara

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  17. Barbara, What a nice verse. Thank you for introducing it to me. I always think chicory has the bluest of all flowers, lovely. The daylilies are pretty en masse like that too.

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  18. Granny Sue -- Color certainly belongs to the aliveness of the natural world. Even in winter one can experience fantastic color. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  19. Sheri -- Glad you liked the Rilke verse. I too, have always loved the blueness of chicory. I found out long ago that one cannot pick a bouquet for inside. The blooms only last a day. I guess that is their way of telling us they like their freedom. -- Thanks -- barbara

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  20. Beautiful! And I love the header!

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  21. Vicki -- Thanks for the kudos on the header. I wish I could find seed containers like these old ones. They would look great in my house. Thanks -- barbara

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