.

.

Friday, June 17, 2011

AN OLD PORCH ROCKER AND AN OLD USED FACADE



Now used for storage, this old building has served its community well. It was once a school house then a general store and lastly an antique store. Now it serenely sits out its days providing a scenic "window" into the past of Mt Vernon, Kentucky.

24 comments:

  1. I love old store fronts. Wonder if it had a bell that jangled when someone opened the door.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mama-Bug -- Thanks for the comment -- I do know about the bell rhat tang in old general stores but I didn't get a chance to go inside this one. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  3. I would like to sit on that rocking chair and rock and rock and rock. Great photo! Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Surprising to see the rocker still there. It's kinda sad to see a building vacant when it has been so useful over the years.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I recall both my grandmothers' homes big porches with a wicker rocking chairs and sitting there on hot summer nights!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Kay -- Big porches were gathering spots for the family before the mosquitoes came out -- thanks -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  7. NCmountainwoman -- There is a story behind the rocker.

    The present owner of the building told me that the building is where his mother had an antique store. After she passed away he sold all her things. But, no one bought the rocker. So, he put it on the porch as a reminder of her. He figured that someday the rocker would come up missing -- but it hasn't in all the years since she has been gone.

    Thanks for the comment -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  8. birdie -- rockers actually give the body a good workout. Maybe that is why they relieve stress and calm the nerves -- thanks for the comment -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  9. There is a certain elegance to this storefront...spectacular!! ~Ronda

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wow, if only walls could talk, imagine all the tales this one could tell!

    That rocker reminds me of the ones my grandmother had on the porch of her old Maine farmhouse. Porch swings are great, but how I do love an old wooden rocking chair!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I think TV is responsible for the decline in porch sitting. Being an early riser I have been on trips and awake before anyone else. If there is a Cracker Barrel nearby I walk there sit on the porch and rock in the sunrise. Better than breakfast. The only detractor is their porches lack the wooden deck.Enjoyed your post as usual they trigger my mind to take me somewhere.

    ReplyDelete
  12. At least it has a good coat of white paint that seems to suggest maybe it's not over for the building until it's taken on another task. Maybe there's still life in it, with a little creativity!

    Nice post, Barbara!
    Elora

    ReplyDelete
  13. Rhonda -- the "storefront" was probably just that when this facade was on the building during its general store days. I imagine the school had a different look to the facade. Thanks for the comments -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  14. Elora -- Hey, welcome back! the building was in good shape for its age. Thanks for stopping by -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  15. Grampy -- you would make a good salesperson for Cracker Barrel and their rocking chairs. I have a rocker on my front porch that is used every day -- not for long periods but long enough to realize all is well with the world for the moment. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  16. Laloofah -- I think that porch swings and rockers are at the top of the list for enjoying a porch. One of my favorite is to sit in my rocker under the cover of my porch during a storm. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  17. Can you imagine the ghosts of customers past clustered around the former shop owner reclining in the chair and commenting on the passing parade?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Jayne -- This store is an old landmark on the outskirts of the downtown section of Mt Vernon. The building is being well taken care of. Maybe someday in the future it will again be used as a commercial establishment and perhaps it will have some folks sitting on the porch? Thanks for stopping -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  19. I always found it enjoyable when old buildings find new life. Why can't they be recycled along with everything else. They have such unique charm. Dianne

    ReplyDelete
  20. Nice picture! You make me want to get out and about a bit more to chronicle some of the old buildings in my area.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Vicki -- love to see the buildings in your area. Thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  22. Dianne --

    I agree exactly with you when it comes to preserving or recycling old buildings. There are two parts to this dilemma involving -- 1) rehabbing an old building for living/commercial space or 2)a "tear-down."

    Preservation/rehabs are costly to do in today's overpriced materials market. It's actually cheaper to throw up a stick type building than preserve. A labor of love could put a building back into usable shape but it seems that corporations/developers are on the fast track method.

    Tear-downs are great resources for quality materials at a cost of practically nothing. But again we need people willing to spend time constructing a building out of old materials. Once my daughter and I were riding down a street in Salt Lake City when we spotted massive stacks of lovely tongue and grove out by the curb. We had a commercial vehicle so we stopped and with consent, loaded up all the wood which was taken out of a 1920s house. We knew a father and son who excitingly took it and paneled their mountain cabin with it. This wood was destined for a landfill.

    I think if we become more aware of old buildings and their materials we can spread the word to folks who are rehabbing or rebuilding to consider using old buildings or recycled materials.

    Granted keeping the old structures is the best thing we can do. But, if we have to rip-out or tear-down we should reuse the old (usually virgin) wood, old bricks, old tiles, old ironwork etc. These materials can find a niche some place -- which is not a landfill.

    Thanks for the comments -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  23. There should be an old character sitting in that rocker, male or female.
    Old and picturesque, to go with the building.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Friko -- yes, the rocker does look a bit forlorn without someone. Probably on occasion someone does sit down in it and rock. Thanks -- barbara

    ReplyDelete