.

.

Thursday, December 23, 2010

AN ARTISAN MARKETPLACE

 FULL BODIED, HUMAN SIZED, SAINT NICK ARTWORK
Yesterday I visited the rather new Kentucky Artisan Center that is located a couple minutes off Interstate 75 an artery connecting  states between Michigan and Florida.   The Center, run by the state of Kentucky,  seems to serve highway travelers in several ways. It has a fine restaurant, restrooms, lots of benches and seating both indoors and outside and a marketplace for Kentucky made goods. One can find artwork, crafts, books, and gourmet food all with ties to the state and for sale.
 
CONTEMPORARY FOLK LIZARD SCULPTURE
Art work and crafts dominate the marketplace. Many beautiful and unusual pieces can be found -- all contemporary and for sale.  

The items cover a broad spectrum, some reflecting the early forms of Kentuckian folk design, while some others, the newly evolved Kentucky arts and crafts, are dynamic and fit well with the old folk forms.

WOVEN RUGS -- THROW RAG RUG TYPE
I took a few photos of pieces that I thought were good examples of the contemporary art work.

FULL BODIED DOG, FOLK ARTWORK

Books by many Kentucky authors such as Barbara Kingsolver or Wendell Berry line the shelves on one wall. I perused them and found a few that I was unfamiliar with. I wrote them down and will order them through my local library.

THE CENTER 'S WING WITH AN INTERPRETIVE APPEARANCE OF EARLY KENTUCKY STONE HOUSES
Overall it was a nice break to visit the Center and stroll through the for sale items made in Kentucky. It was a refreshing exposure to locally made and the idea of  local economies. 

12 comments:

  1. I love the Dalmatian! If you're ever traveling on I-64 through Beckley, WV, be sure to stop at Tamarack. Appalachian/wv artisans' work. The food is done by The Greenbrier and is delicious, but, of course, most captivating is the array of fine Appalachian arts and crafts.

    Have a very lovely holiday season, Barbara!
    Elora

    ReplyDelete
  2. That sounds like a fun way to spend the day! Thanks for taking photos to share with us!

    That Santa is really something - I covet his walking stick (could have used it on my hike this morning!), and love his sock monkey! LOL I love the "fearsome" lizard too!

    Did you get yourself a little present or were you content to just browse? Those woven throw rugs would have tempted me, that raspberry colored one near the bottom of the pile especially, even though that I don't have that color in a single room! :-)

    Pretty stone buildings, too!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Elora -- thanks for the comment about the Appalachian arts and crafts place in WV. I like to look at arts and crafts more than I like to buy. Always interested in the interpretations of animals and landscapes that folksy artisans come up with. Myself -- I'm lucky if I can draw a straight line.
    Can't wait to see what you'll be up to in your new dye house!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm so glad to learn about outlets for local artisans -- and the pieces you photographed are delightful. I especially liked Santa's quilt coat. It would be wonderful for all states to have these places on their major highways. And I'm glad to read from Elora that one exists in W. Va. Such a relief from the fast food and boring 7-11 offerings and important exposure for the craftspeople.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I loved the Santa, especially his tack quilt coat. Will have to stop at this center the next time I am traveling 1-75. There is another great stop along 75 but closer to Knoxville started by John Rice. Do you know the name of it? Fantastic local crafts, museum, and food!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wonderful folk art -- love that St.Nick and his patchwork coat.

    A very merry Christmas to you, Barbara!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Vicki -- Seasons Greetings -- I imagine in NC that there is a state sponsored center or museum that provides cultural aspects of your region such as art, crafts and food. I liked the quilt coat on Santa too. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  8. Darcy -- Yes, there is an excellent museum in TN just off 75 that provides its patrons with a superior Appalachian cultural experience. I highly recommend it. It is called the Museum of Appalachia and their website address is:

    http://www.museumofappalachia.org/Folk%20Art%20at%20the%20Museum%20of%20Appalachia_.html

    They have a small homespun place to grab a lunch that can include wonderful southern cornbread freshly baked. Local art work can be purchased in the main bldg where you eat and purchase your tickets to the museum.

    Seasons Greetings -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  9. June -- I agree about providing a showplace for local culture along main corridors in all of the states. I know that some federal parks in the west have local art on display and for purchase that are juried and of beautiful quality but they are usually off the beaten path. Seasons Greetings -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  10. Looks like an interesting spot for a break. I love the spotty dog.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Laloofah -- No I did not buy anything at the Artisan Center. For now, I buy with my camera -- taking photos rather then taking artwork. My house runnith over with folk art and other quirky cultural and natural items. But it was a fun place to stop and view all the wonderful items. Thanks for the comments. Seasons Greetings -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  12. barefootheart -- It did provide a nice break for me -- with lots of wonderful itmes to view. The spotty dog was a cutie -- would look good in your lovely gardens. -- barbara

    ReplyDelete