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Tuesday, July 20, 2010

ROBBING OUR BREAD BASKET

An old rickety barn sits in a flourishing field of tobacco and corn while in the background one can detect the sneaking encroachment of land development. Commercial, residential, plus highway development contribute to the loss of our country's prime acreage that is used for all of our food. Are you aware of this ongoing loss of prime farmland throughout our country? Remember we have been called the, "bread basket of the world." Perhaps we should reflect on what is happening to our "bread basket.".

A non-profit organization called the Farmland Trust works with federal, state and local leaders -- trying to keep farmers on their land and also to protect our environment. They tell us that less than 1/5 of U.S. land is high quality and that we are losing this fine land on an ongoing basis. Click here to view the top ten states that lost prime farm land between 1992 and 1997.

Think on this issue and be aware of the consequences the next time you think you need more development i.e. a new larger house, new malls, theme parks, and all the other forms of environmental commercialization.

6 comments:

  1. A frightening thing to imagine a coast to coast stretch of developments.

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  2. We've had a similar thing happen here with the North-South Pipeline taking water away from the drought-effected Victoria's Foodbowl just so we can flush toilets here in Melbourne.

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  3. Vicki -- I don't think it will ever get to that point. Not enough water in the southwest -- unless they take it from the Great Lakes or similar rich bodies of water. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. Jayne -- It does sound like madness. Many governments play Russian Roulette with their natural resources (U.S. included). Thanks for the informative comment -- barbara

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  5. It's happening everywhere, it seems. In the Toronto area, development has sprawled all along the edge of Lake Ontario for miles and miles, displacing some of the province's very best farmland and orchards. Insane.

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  6. barefootheart -- Sad to hear about the Toronto area. I have not been there in decades -- I am sure I would not recognize it now. The saddest thing I saw was housing developers skimming off the land's rich topsoil to sell before the houses were built -- this was in Illinois. --- barbara

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