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Sunday, July 4, 2010

LOSING A BIRDHOUSE AND A HOME -- Sunday Simplicities

BIRDHOUSE -- REPLICATE OF AN EASTERN KENTUCKY FARMHOUSE

I've lived in many homes in my life-time. All different -- small, large, country, town, city, artist studio, cottage, campground, historic house, apartment, and fairly new. Although each was very different, the old adage rings true when I think of them all -- the heart is where the home is.

With today's economy many folks are losing their homes. A very sad situation. My thoughts go out to them. And, today I am telling a little sad story that relates to not only the economic situation, but the birdhouse in this post..


DETAIL OF SIDING APPROPRIATE TO A DERELICT FARMHOUSE

A Kentucky man and wife lost their home. He is a carpenter. He is a thoughtful husband. Let me give you an example of his thoughtfulness. His wife loves birds. So, over several years he built her magical, folksy birdhouses for their yard. All six were different and lovingly made. Works of art. But then they lost everything and the birdhouses were sold. I acquired one of the birdhouses. I also acquired the sad story that went with it. I will always view this birdhouse with hope. Hope that the couple turned their life around and he again has started to build birdhouses for his wife in a new home. And, hope for all the people that have lost their homes in this economic turn-down.

SIDE PORCH OF BIRDHOUSE

The carpenter husband built my birdhouse based on a photo he saw of a derelict old Eastern Kentucky farmhouse. He incorporated the worn look right down to the weather-board siding. He meticulously placed a hundred-plus individual pieces of miniature wood weather-board siding on the birdhouse to replicate the authenticity of the farmhouse. A metal roof was added and painted as it would have been on an Eastern Kentucky home. A side porch has delicate architectural decor parading around it. The house measures approximately 16" X 21" X 21".


BIRDHOUSE -- DETAIL OF METAL ROOF

It is not only the couple that lost their home but so did the many birds that visited their birdhouses. Birds are fragile yet are tough survivors. I can only think that the couple will be tough survivors like so many others that have lost their homes.

On this day -- the 4th of July -- I find it difficult to celebrate. Maybe next year?

Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom -- Thomas Jefferson

4 comments:

  1. What a beautiful piece of craftsmanship, Barbara.
    I, too, hope the couple are able to start inviting their feathered friends into new creations.

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  2. Jayne -- It seems that life can hand people some tough blows but usually they adapt and change and life becomes good again. I think that is where hope plays a part.-- barbara

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  3. A wonderful birdhouse and piece of craftsmanship. Here's hoping for better times for the craftsman -- and for the economy.

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  4. Vicki, Thanks for the comment. The birdhouse, like you mention, is a work of art. -- barbara

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