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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

PICNIC IN A FRENCH GARDEN

My French friend, an ex-pat, sends me views of France on a regular basis. To me, it is always interesting as they reflect the culture from a non-tourist view. I like to share some of her photos and words as we are all connected around the world. She lives in Paris and quite frequently visits other places in the area. She recently visited some friends in the country for a picnic by their garden. Under a large old tree they spread out a cloth on a table and sat in chairs, breathing in the country air. while eating their lunch. Their house stands in the background -- an 18th century home -- one that they are working on.

The garden seemed quite formal from the photos my friend sent. It appears divided into sections all with linear plantings. Above are leeks growing in the right-hand rows. My friend was told by her country friends that if you tie a knot in the tops of the leeks while growing, they will have a better taste.


This photo has a display of blue flowers -- both flowers and vegetables are grown in the home garden.

It looked like a lovely day for a country picnic under the large ancient tree, out amongst the beautiful growing veggies and flowering blooms. So peaceful.

10 comments:

  1. Lovely! I wonder if the "blue flowers" are lavender? What fun it is to "visit" other's gardens and homes through the Net! Indeed, peaceful. Thank you, Barbara!

    Elora

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  2. Elora, I feel the world can connect through nature such as home gardens, outdoor activities, and information. You are right, the net allows us to see around the world. I just found a great site called 350.org -- I put it on my sidebar under great sites. Bill McKibben started it. Perhaps you are familiar with it? -- barbara

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  3. Ah, so idyllic. We have a big 'ol pine tree like that at WM!

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  4. Lovely pictures! Europeans seem to eat outside often when entertaining -- a fine idea!

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  5. willow -- Do you picnic outside under your old large tree? I have a feling your do. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  6. Totally gorgeous pics :)

    The previous post, about the pollinators, is scary. So far, here in Oz, we don't have the mite that kills the bees but it's a waiting game :(

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  7. Vicki -- With your beautiful gardens you probably entertain guests outside so they can enjoy the view. Thank you for leaving a comment -- barbara

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  8. Jayne -- You are fortunate that you don't have bee mites in your country. Do you have the colony collapse problem. I appreciate your comments -- barbara

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  9. I just came over from Willow's blog...now tell me more about that uncle of yours....sounds fascinating....do you ever write about him?
    My grandpa used to come over dressed all the way up with a bag of bananas for us kids! We wanted candy..but he always brought bananas
    ..and i loved it when he came

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  10. Suz -- thanks for stopping by. I viewed your nice blogs and discovered you are from the Midwest. I was raised in Michigan -- your use of the word grandpa gave you away as probably being from the North.

    I have been writing for many years in various forms. I enjoy it very much. And yes I have wrote about my great uncle as well as many other of the characters in my wonderful family. One of my favorite authors who writes about her family is Bailey White. From your blog I take it that you are a writer. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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