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Sunday, May 9, 2010

IMPERFECTIONS -- SUNDAY SIMPLICITIES

For me there is a certain beautiful quality that erupts from objects that are aged, textured, and show some signs of deterioration. All my senses get involved with the object. There is a certain imperfection that comes about over time -- cracks, chips, scratches, and overall blemishes. Even with these flaws they remain vibrant and timely.

I use them everyday. This old chipped plate edged in roses is just perfect for slices of apples or chunks of oranges. I linger and smile over the plate's ability to still survive the many years it has been around. Providing intangible feelings.


This old pottery pitcher is only used for displaying long stemmed flowers from my garden such as sunflowers and cosmos. Spotted from age, it resembles sun spots on aged hands. When I glance at it filled with flowers, I begin to daydream. Who made this handmade pitcher over a hundred years ago? How did it get that big chip on its lip? All manner of thought drifts through my mind. Made when time moved slower.

A handmade chair with a hickory splint bottom will last forever, even when the splints have broken away from the weave toward the front. Its a work horse. Even with its deterioration.


An old empty gilded frame hangs on my wall. Its gilded paint is cracked and chipped in many places. Its emptiness reflects time to me.

Imperfections can be beautiful if we open our minds to them.

6 comments:

  1. Patina or shabby-chic are some other descriptions of a look I love -- the history of a chair, its rocker chewed by a long-ago puppy, the frayed edge of hand towels that were my grandmother's -- and maybe even the wrinkles and age spots on my hands . . .

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  2. Vicki, If we accepted most imperfections of humans and non-humans I believe the world would be a better place. That was the subtle message of my post. I used the objects to try and give the message. Thanks for the feedback on my post! I too love old artifacts no matter the condition. -- barbara

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  3. Maybe at the heart of the word "imperfection" lies another word: authentic. When we watch Antiques Roadshow on PBS (there are a FEW good things on TV, but not many, I'll admit!)we learn that the more valuable pieces of furniture, firearms, and other miscellaneous artifacts and antiques are those which remain un-refinished. It is not those unblemished, re-painted, covered-over items, that bring the most money. It is those which carry the mark of authenticity--imperfections--which garner the most interest and the highest dollar value. Last night, for example, a Winchester rifle that was un-retouched, brought substantially more ($1,000+), than did the same model, but which had had the brass polished. Maybe all imperfections are rather marks of genuine-ness, and serve to show us the things (and people) that are real. Thank you, Barbara!

    Elora

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  4. Elora -- very well said! What prompted my post was an incident that happened in Utah where my granddaughter lives. She was in a local tennis tournament and witnessed an occurrence. She told me about it and thus -- the post. The occurrence was -- a teenage girl walked out on the court to play her opponent and realized he was in a wheel chair. She quickly walked off the court and went up to the director and said " I came here to play real tennis." "I am leaving!"
    I thought about this insensitive teenager and the disparaging remark she made. Then I thought about the analogy of material objects and even though they have cracks and chips we love them. As with people, they have cracks and chips, sometimes seen and sometimes not, but they are all authentic and worthy of respect. -- barbara

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  5. I love anything with a cozy worn patina.

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  6. Thanks willow for your nice comment. you have a wonderful blog! -- barbara

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