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Sunday, May 2, 2010

DEEPWATER HORIZON -- MAP OF THE DAY BY DAY MOVEMENT OF THE OIL SPILL

AMERICAN ALLIGATOR -- AT RISK FROM THE DEEPWATER OIL SPILL
source: Wikipedia

As you probably already know thousands upon thousands of wildlife are at risk due to the recent oil spill. It does not look good at this point.

The New York Times has an interactive map site for you to view the onslaught of oil headed into natural refuge areas. It's sad to view but one needs to realize the damage that oil can and will do to our valued wildlife. Given that the oil flow will continue for however long, can we be looking at a future wasteland in this coastal area? Thousands of wildlife species and habitat areas perhaps being lost.

Click here to view the interactive map and hit play to view the evolution of the growing oil spill

An additional MSNBC map of species location along the coast is available for viewing here. This is an exceptional map for realizing the wildlife involved. Just hover over the red dots on the map and it will bring up the information.

14 comments:

  1. The sad thing is, on top of the very real possibility of losing these beautiful animals, is that their extinction could probably be in vain as mans greed will blind him to these warnings and lessons.

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  2. I have been disappointed with the TV coverage we have been getting here. To date, it has mostly involved repeated interviews with shrimp fishermen who will lose their income this year. While I am sorry for their loss, that is barely the tip of the iceberg in terms of the damage expected! Thankyou for your coverage and the good links! We can't really afford the true cost of our oil addiction.

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  3. I can't take my mind away from this needless tragedy. It's akin to grieving for a lost family member.

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  4. Jayne, Did Australia have a similar incident a few years ago -- of a blow-out oil rig in ocean waters? If so, how was that handled by the people and the press? How severe was it? I know I am asking lots of questions but I am so disgruntled about our culture allowing such atrocities to happen here in the U.S. I agree with you and thank you for your insightful comments -- barbara

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  5. barefootheart -- the coverage here has been much like yours. always focusing on the economic fallout. Very little has been discussed of the species misfortune. I thought the links were very illustrative of the horror of it all. Fortunately the media did post these maps -- unfortunately they were buried in their online coverage. Thanks for your input -- barbara

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  6. NCmountainwoman -- I like you feel a a dark foreboding about this event and especially grief for the wildlife -- thanks for your sensitive comment -- barbara

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  7. Without a doubt the consequences will be long lasting for the entire country -- it's all connected.

    Thanks for stopping by my place, Barbara -- I'm happy to find your blog too!

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  8. Vicki Lane -- Thanks for the comment on the oil spill. Now the media is saying the spill can spread as far as Fla and possibly up the east coast. Don't know how they can say this but I guess anything can happen at this point! -- barbara

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  9. Barbara,
    I tried to post a comment yesterday and it evaporated into cyberspace! The kernel of thought in it went along the lines of when will we stop BELIEVING all these tycoons who espouse the "gee, I didn't know the gun was loaded" type of rhetoric! This past weekend, here in WV, there's old Blankenship grabbing any venue he can to declare that Massey Energy is blameless in the death of 29 miners. And this old saw, "they won't have died in vain.." is simply disgusting. Massey Energy has the worst record of any company in worker safety. The Blankeships, the Blankfeins (CEO of Goldman Sachs), oh...and let's not forget old "grandfatherly" Warren Buffet, who spend all last week declaring the blamelessness of Goldman Sachs...and we all know why: he owns $5-billion worth of GS stock, bonds and other "derivatives." So...we're supposed to believe Warren Buffet that Goldman Sachs, Henry Paulson (former Treasury Secretary) just didn't understand all these complicated investments??? Come on! It's all the same game, whether it's Blankfein, Blankenship, or Buffet. We need to wake up and realize that only Federal intervention and tough regulations AND ENFORCEMENT are key to "not dying in vain" baloney. The animals you've featured, Barbara, with the beautiful photos, WILL have died in vain unless the oil industry is brought to heel. The oil giants are already off and running on this summer's "driving season." Price are on their way up and are predicted to be in the $3.50-$4.00 range for the summer. Oil/gasoline should be nationalized and put into the category of a "utility"...something everyone needs. And, it should be heavily regulated under FEDERAL LAW. Thanks for letting me vent on your site, Barbara!
    Elora

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  10. I just read Paul Krugman's column in the NY Times. Go to:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/03/opinion/03krugman.html

    It's well worth a read.

    Elora

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  11. Elora -- First the Krugman article -- he brought up some very good points about the lax attitude of the general public toward the environment. One little thing that he said bothered me -- that the environment cannot take care of itself. The environment has taken care of itself for thousands upon thousands of years. Perhaps he meant that unregulated harm can injure the environment.
    Secondly -- in the Midwest there is a phrase, "you go girl." The phrase means to tell it like it is. After reading the Krugman piece I would like to say that we need folks like you that are aware of what is going on in the world of corporate mismanagement and is willing to speak out about it. Thanks for both of your comments and -- you go girl!

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  12. I have been watching this situation unfold with despair Barbara. How many times do these events have to happen? It really is infuriating.

    We have had far too many oil spills in Australia. The latest one, in April, threatened our Great Barrier Reef. A coal ship entered a restricted area and foundered. There have been reports that large fines and possible prison sentences are pending for those responsible. If greed / irresponsibility leads to this type of environmental damage, then one way to start addressing it should be by using the perpetrators own bank balance i.e. MASSIVE financial disincentives and punishments. Maybe then, investment in green alternatives will really start to be their only option.

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  13. We had the other oil spill from the oil well off WA, too, The Montara Spill which was and still is a nightmare.
    Communities are making themselves heard holding rallys, like Margaret River's rally tomorrow to try to stop these wells springing up everywhere.

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  14. I checked out The Montara Spill that you mentioned in your comment. What a tragic spill it was. We are grinding Mother Earth down to a nubbin! So sad. -- barbara

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