.

.

Sunday, November 1, 2015

EARLY COUNTRY I-HOUSE -- KY



This early country house in Kentucky is like many of the small modest houses of this form. Many dating back to the 1800's they are numerous in the southern and eastern part of the United States. This particular one was found in the country near Lancaster, Kentucky. It is a great example of the small simple I-House. Very practical, vernacular and popular in southern states.

18 comments:

  1. I see houses like this in rural northern Alabama, even in the small towns. Some are so small they remind me of the currently popular tiny houses.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lisa -- great art post on your blog -- "gardening"
      Would be wonderful to see someone write a book (with photos) about these small vernacular homes of the south. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  2. As I recently moved to a "tiny house" apartment...not quite as small as the popular "tiny houses" but still smaller than my last cottage...I am looking closely at how people lived in smaller quarters.
    Thanks for your kind comment today on my blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara -- Oh I can relate to tiny as my new apartment is also tiny. Owners of tiny houses have blogs online -- they should give you a few ideas of how to live comfortably in one. Also there are some videos online too about the same idea. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  3. Yes, popular is the word. In Southern Indiana where I grew up I saw a good many houses somewhat like this --- and, yes, most had older vehicles -- car, tractor -- parked near-by. I feel they are very honest dwellings, without pretense -- practical for people who live lives that must be practical and very frugal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. June -- They truly are honest dwellings -- simple, modest forms that captures their lives. I imagine the folks that lived in these type of houses knew a lot about self survival skills such as how to mechanically fix a tractor or car and save seeds and more. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  4. My aunt and uncle lived in such a house, until my uncle enlarged it in the early sixties. The upstairs was divided into two dormitory style rooms; the boys slept in one, the girls in the other. The staircase, of course, was steep and narrow. I believe it went upstairs from one of the front rooms. Until the remodel, there was only an outhouse, although there was a pump in the kitchen sink. This aunt was my father's youngest sister, but all my cousins were much older than I because they married so early and he so late. Visiting all my cousins on my dad's side was like travelling to another world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne -- Visiting your cousins might seem like another world but I bet there was a whole world to take in from how and where they lived. I am fascinated every time I have the opportunity to visit such worlds! Hope you have photos of some of your cousins. -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  5. A fine old house. People didn't need such big houses as they spent most of the daylight hours outdoors. My grandmother once told me that she had no memories of her father indoors, unless he was eating or sleeping! They also met everyone they knew out of doors so visitors were a rarity. A different world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John -- Very interesting. Was your grandfather a farmer? I ask that as I remember my family elders that farmed spending lots of time outdoors. Also your description of meeting everyone outdoors -- I wonder if this was a traditional way in the UK at the time of your great-grandparent's?. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  6. There is something typical about many houses in the countryside - I have seen it many countries (including my own): A nice little house in a clearing, but surrounded by disused cars, tractors and other paraphernalia. Monochrome was prefect for the atmosphere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. visualnorway -- So home yards in other countries follow those like the ones in Kentucky. And really all over our country as I have seen in my U.S. travels. I read a thesis about such yard collections which was titled "White Gardens" (in Oregon). thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  7. The I-houses I'm familiar with have two rooms downstairs, two upstairs, a central staircase and two chimneys. The chimneys are on the outside of the house if the fireplaces are on the outside wall and on the inside of the house if the fireplaces are on the central walls. That determines (usually) whether there are any windows on the side of the house. Did this one have chimneys that have been removed? Note also the cinder block foundation. That's obviously new if this as an old I-house. Here they have rock foundations. Note the addition on the back. As you probably know, in the old houses the bathroom and kitchen were separate buildings, which is why I-houses nearly always have additions like this. Thanks for sharing this. Love to see the old places still being used.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill -- thanks for the good observations. I wish that I could answer all the details on this house but I did not have the opportunity to talk with the owners. The foundation seems to be one that either is a replacement or is a new excavation with the blocks. When I lived in KY I was friends with an older man that knew the history of his house. His historic home was without a basement until about the 60s when he and his wife thought it would be nice to have one. A cinder block basement was dug out and erected by the "not so old man at the time." Sometimes such changes in old houses can skew observations. Chimneys are sometimes also replaced with roofing when electricity is brought into a household, If only houses could talk -- thanks again -- barbara

      Delete
  8. Appears to have a neat and well taken care of ambiance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tabor -- When I took the photo I felt that is was a typical KY country setting -- the place looking well cared for. I would like to mention that I am enjoying your blog, One Day at a Time. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  9. There are quite a few similar houses here in western NC -- still being lived in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vicki -- thanks so much for stopping by. Your recent photos on your blog were a real treat. Yes, houses like the one in this blog seem to appear in many states. Even a rare one in Michigan where I am from originally. thanks -- barbara

      Delete