.

.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

A "TINY" FARMERS MARKET





This month Farmers Markets are exploding throughout Oregon with freshly grown produce from local gardens. Farmers Markets reflect the needs of the folks that are located near them. As an example a less populated area will not have a large farmer's market while a larger city will have a large one. So Farmers Markets come in all sizes -- large, medium and small. But in this post I am adding a forth size I came upon in my Oregon wanderings. -- "tiny". The area surrounding this tiny market is called Deadwood an unincorporated community of less than 300 people. 

Above is the homemade sign on its way to be posted at the market. The day I visited there were less than half a dozen vendors. But the produce offered was diverse and fresh. 

Here is a sampler of the "tiny" market images ----


Fresh picked blueberries -- no chemicals.


Some of the vendors and their booths.



Fresh picked wax beans, peas, and zucchini.
No chemicals.



An ancient scale to weigh the produce in this case -- blackberries. 


Two different kinds of sweet plums. 
My taste buds will attest to their sweetness.
No chemicals.


Have some fun with friends and/or family . Visit different Farmer's Markets during the growing season. Support your local growers.





20 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Florence -- Glad that you are a supporter of your local farmers -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  2. Oh how literally sweet! And healthy and tasty and on such a natural, human scale! I love how the person in the overalls matched the sign, a sense of whimsy here. Thanks for sharing this delight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rita -- I too noticed the sign man seemed to match his sign that he was leaning on. He held up those neat jeans with great orange suspenders. This was definitely a place where you found salt of the earth folks -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Tabor -- agree completely! -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  4. Almost a "pop up." I hope it is successful enough to keep repeating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne -- I was made to understand that this tiny market had been around for quite awhile. Locals serving locals. -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  5. Great to see vendors gathering with produce...it looks like an old fashioned roadside stand. We have several of those around which have grown up to have a roof over them, with electricity, only open during produce season. Love knowing things are organic and local...the best way to stay healthy. And the demand is growing for that! YAY! Hope you're doing well. Keep on posting, since I love your photos. Nice header too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara -- Sounds like you are an advocate of organic and local produce -- this is good! I too am always on the look out for such produce. Oregon has so many farmers markets. I lived here many years ago and so can compare the growth of such markets between then and now. I am doing well -- am taking a trip to Mount Shasta in a few weeks to meet up with granddaughter and daughter. Hope you are enjoying your summer -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  6. What a wonderful promotion for all things fresh. Delicious!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Raining Iguanas -- It seems that farmer's markets have replaced the roadside stands -- but no matter one can still get fresh. -- thanks barbara

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Michelle -- they were exceptionally good! -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  8. Here must be something for everyone! I think Ipfrefer the blue plums (looks lihe "early Rivers" - my favourite(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. visualnorway -- Oh, perhaps that is the name of these wonerful plums. they were picked off an old homestead tree and the farmer didn't know the real name -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  9. We have farmer's markets all over the place too, large,small and tiny,with more and more customers all the time. The market we frequent most often, and that I'll be going down to in a couple of hours is the Hilo Farmers' Market. It has been in business since the early 90s and was the first farmers' market to accept food stamps. I haven't taken pix for a while but will today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hattie -- I would imagine your farmer's market would offer some different varieties of produce of Oregon or the Midwest. Would be nice to see some of your photos after you have been to the market. -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  10. It's all good. We love our tiny/small farmers markets...:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. troutbirder -- It is all good and I find the prices usually better than the produce in stores. -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete