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Wednesday, June 17, 2015

KENTUCKY OLD BARN GALLERY


Red barn found in Waco area

Living in rural Kentucky for six years, before I moved here to Oregon, I was astounded by the beauty of the old barns that still remained on their landscapes. Some were decaying and some were in fine shape as seen by the red barn above. During my Kentucky stay I took many photos of barns and plan to scatter a few posts over the next few months featuring them. All are from the central part of Kentucky. All the barns are diverse, no two alike, large and small giving us a glimpse of the talented barn builders of yesterday.




Have a seat and enjoy the beautiful day.



Decaying barn with old advertising painted on its side.




Barns have many uses today -- here are stored rolled bales for feed



Old "sentinel" barn watching over the hillside -- slowly aging.


Old and in fine shape

21 comments:

  1. Great barns! You should join in on The Barn Collective.

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    1. Furry Gnome -- thanks for the comment -- I will check into The Barn Collective to see what it is all about. -- barbara

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    1. Tabor -- I probably have enough for a book but for now I'll just post them for history sake. thank for the nice comment -- barbara

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  3. Wonderful barns (I have to say I especially like the one with red doors, nicely accessorized too. And I think the final one echoing the mountain behind is pure art). If you should choose, you must have enough for a fine book of barn photos. It would be a pleasure.

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    1. June -- the barn with the red door definitely is rather unique. I met the quaint woman about in her eighties that lived alone in her cottage type home on the barn property. She told me stories of the barn and other buildings on the property, I love meeting these "down home" folks and listening to their stories of the area. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  4. Love old barns! I wonder on the one with the ad on its side, how the roof came to be pushed out, rather than collapsed in. Just wondering. Never gonna know!

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    1. Barbara -- As a young wife with small children we lived on a farm that had a large dairy barn. This is where I fell in love with barns. My cousin and I examined that old barn from top to bottom and were smitten with how it was constructed with large wooden beams, trusses and wood planks. Funny how early experiences remain in your mind. The roof on the barn with ad looks like it was hit by a wind storm. Some of those old tin roofs suffered ruffled roofs from the high winds that sometimes went through the area. -- thanks for the nice comment, barbara

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  5. I love barns, too. The first one appears to be a horse farm barn. I wonder if the one storing bales was a tobacco drying barn. The last one may have been cows. I'm less familiar with KY barns than Ohio barns.

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    1. Joanne -- I can understand why you love barns -- Ohio has great barns. I played in many when I was a child.The barns use seems right in line with your suggested possibilities. Horses are found in abundance in Central Kentucky. Cattle is another farm occupation that is seen often. And yes, hundreds of barns were used for what KY was famous for -- tobacco. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  6. You have a great cross section of central KY barns. I always love seeing the old ones with the advertising on the side. Not many of those left.

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    1. Michelle -- You certainly do have a diverse collection of different types of barns in your wonderful state of KY. Miss those days when I would cruise around the back roads taking photos. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  7. Very nice! We\have a few old round barns here which are my favorites An and Ithought that letter to your granddaughter was very special...:)

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    1. troutbirder -- thanks for your nice comment. Round barns are beautiful but do not seem to be common in most states that I have lived in. My granddaughter, as well as all granddaughters are special to us grandparents. --- barbara

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  8. I love the colors on those barns.

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    1. Hattie -- All the barns I ran into in central KY had earthy colors. Those colors made them feel so nestled on the land. Thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  9. Hi Barbara, they are such a contrast to today's uniform pre-fab construction. Such variety! And the old wood is just lovely. I wonder if the care that went into some of these barns reflects the care that is given to the animals inside...

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    1. Rita -- One thing I noticed in Central KY is that most animal farms are not mega and that the animals enjoy free range. I think when you see a decayed barn it is a sign of abandonment. Abandonment as a result usually of farming hardships of trying to compete with large commercial growers across the country. thanks -- barbara

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  10. I love old barns! You've posted some pretty neat ones. We have a lot of old barns in our area, I'm amazed at how they stand the test of time. Most of the advertising I see on them in around here are for Mail pouch tobacco.

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    1. Janet -- Mail Pouch tobacco barns seem to have been very popular in the Midwest and Upper South. I find it amazing that some folks have never been in a barn -- but I've met a few! - thanks -- barbara

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  11. I lived in W. Virginia for a year way back when. Once a week our little family would all pile in our car after dinner and drive the countryside enjoying the rural landscapes that included beautiful farms with barns. I often wonder how many of those farms remain on the landscapes of W. Virginia. thanks for your comment -- barbara

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