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Friday, January 9, 2015

NEIGHBORHOOD STREET TREES





Trees are ever present as one rides around Oregon. To me it is what makes part of Oregon absolutely beautiful. It's winter here right now and because of the huge majority of conifers there is always the presence of greenery in the landscape. 

I like to ride around the neighborhoods that are on the fringes of Portland. Once they were their own little villages until incorporated by the large city of Portland. One neighborhood is Multnomah Village.

Multnomah Village is a charming village with an active small downtown and a long established neighborhood that surround the old commercial area filled with several small businesses such as  a book store, a bike repair and a couple coffee houses.

To give one an example of the charm of the neighborhood snuggled within the village perimeter I took this street view of conifer trees that  were used as street trees. Street trees being those that line the streets.  

Being raised as a Midwesterner I was used to large deciduous trees lining neighbor streets. Trees such as oak, elms, and maples that provided lush leaves in the summer and fall yet no lush leaves could be found in the winter.  

Here in the Pacific Northwest one finds very tall trees that provide a greenscape all year round. Take a look at the photo above that I shot to understand what I am talking about. 

I am not saying that the Pacific Northwest is the best as I believe there is good in all types of environmental regions. Like humans of different ethnic makeups -- trees are much the same -- providing different yet beautiful landscapes in their own way.  

24 comments:

  1. The trees look splendid but I can't ever recall seeing conifers used as street trees in England, though you see splendid specimens in some parks and gardens.

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    1. John -- That is interesting that your country does not have tree planting. Somehow in my small world I figured that most of the western world would have this. This is what makes like life so interesting -- diversity of patterns. -- barbara

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  2. Yes, I remember the trees are so different in other areas. And the trees of the Northwest are exceptional.

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    1. Tabor -- When I first visited the south I was surprised by the many trees that I was not familiar with. I shouldn't have been surprised as location in different weather conditions involve plants with different growth patterns. thanks -- barbara

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  3. How I wish I could be there to see your neighbourhood. And I'm sure you would enjoy photographing our medieval market town.

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    1. Carole Anne -- I would love to view your medieval market town. Are you going to photograph some of it or maybe even video parts -- would enjoy. -- thanks barbara

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  4. We are blessed with year round green here!

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    1. Melissa -- I have lived in the upper south, the midwest, the southwest. and the pacific northwest. Each area brought a whole new dimension of the environment to my life. Each in its own regard offers much. -- thanks barbara

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  5. It's part of what makes us such an interesting country, the diversity of landscape. I also like the idea of Portland being comprised of many little villages. I may never get there to see.

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    1. Joanne -- What I remember mostly of my trips through the middle of Ohio as a girl was the absolutely beautiful farmsteads. I don't know if they are still there? Hope so!

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  6. Love that photo of the conifers all lined up like they're on duty, eager to provide beauty and shade (even if their shade isn't especially required in January!) :-) I love trees, and miss the variety of large shade trees (like the incomparable sugar maples) and conifers that we had in New England. And we sure loved all those impressive, stately conifers in the Puget Sound area when we visited!

    Your posts about Portland really make me eager to visit to it! I'm glad you get so many opportunities to go exploring with your camera!

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    1. Laloofah -- Today we are encased in dense fog. Part of the usual winter scene of Oregon. Some folks love it-- some hate it. Location is so important to a person's personality. I have been lucky as each area where I have lived has been full of natural wonders. Each area was different.

      I think the West as a whole has a lot to offer in natural beauty -- perhaps that is part of the reason why the population has grown so much over the past few years. I hope that population density does not overload the natural areas. -- thanks barbara

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  7. "I think that I shall never see a thing so lovely as a tree" :)))

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    1. Starr -- Good to hear from you -- know you are busy with home schooling. My oldest daughter home schooled her youngest son who is now in college -- he even rc'd a scholarship!

      Like your quote -- very fitting for a nature woman like you -- thanks -- barbara
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  8. Midwesterner and now a New Englander, this street scene seems exotic and fascinating to me. I think of the very different feel of Florida where tall palms sometimes line streets, that too is exotic -- somehow both make me a little uncomfortable. Places I'd like to visit but ... well if I lived there, I think I'd become comfortable. Greenery all year is appealing, especially in January as I look out my window at bare branches.

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    1. June -- I loved the snow days in Michigan. Everything seemed so new and sounds were muffled in the thick snow layers. Of course it was cold but one gets used to it like one does with most environments. Now that I am older I don't know if I could handle the cold and snow -- unless I had a snow shovel-er to hire for the drive to be cleared. But like you say it just take some adjustments.

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  9. What majestic tall trees these are! Good capture, Barbara. We do tend to use the deciduous trees along streets for some reason (speaking for all Americans of course)...glad you've got greenery now!

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    1. Barbara -- And I must say that deciduous trees are the memories of my childhood.
      The shade they threw and the rustling of their leaves on windy days has stayed with me for many years. Also the blaze of their color palette in the fall. Can't beat their color show. thanks -- barbara

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  10. I love seeing such tall trees. Means they've been growing for quite some time. We actually have some kind of pine needle tree in our neighborhood that I pass on my walks. Not sure where they came from as I can't imagine they are indigenous to this area. Best wishes, Tammy

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    1. Tammy -- Perhaps you are a trail of tree history. I imagine your indigenous plants vary widely form the U.S. Would be fun to study them. -- thanks barbara

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  11. I do associate Oregon with trees and mountains too...I'm so glad you are experiencing your treed environment. I love the way you choose your homeplaces and then enjoy them fully. Trees were a very special part of my childhood, it was fun to discover them for the first time, probably before kindergarten, with my mom! (pressing leaves into scrapbooks).

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    1. Similar to your early experience with your mother, I collected beautiful fall leaves and pressed them with an iron between waxed paper with my mother's watchful eye.That way they could last almost forever. I do believe our early warm experiences do shape our interests in later years. Every day I discover something more amazing about nature that I was unaware of in the earlier part of my life due to the frenzy of raising a brood of children and working full time. That is one of the reasons I am enjoying retirement so much -- I finally have a personal full life. Thanks for the nice comments -- barbara

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    2. Yes, yes, early experiences. And we did the waxed paper method too. Wasn't it fascinating to really see the different shapes & colors....Retirement has such gifts. I'm just getting ready to go back into it after working for almost 4 months...I noticed how I stopped observing & reflecting the way I had been doing.

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    3. Rita -- Agree with you that retirement has such gifts -- I feel fortunate to be in this period of life. Wonderful that you will now have your time to be back observing and reflecting. Those two actions are surely great gifts to you in your retirement. thanks -- barbara

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