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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

LONG AGO IN KENTUCKY


Once upon a time this was a busy porch where folks stepped up through the double doors into this general store. Still standing today, yet vacant of goods -- its vintage facade reminds the town's old-timers of its former activity. Their memories light up. And then there are those that think it is an eyesore. What do you think? 



26 comments:

  1. I definitely think the echoes of laughter linger in places like this. Wonderful shot, almost b&w, but that blue sky corner which is reflected in window...yes. And I have to think...there's a perfectly fine rocker sitting there...mmm.

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    1. Barbara -- Yes, I am sure it provided a place where a neighborhood grapevine existed -- that hub of humanity where everybody knows you. The photo is like a black and white -- I could have clipped the sky edge but I kinda liked to show the beautiful blue day. thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  2. It holds memories as it returns to the earth as all things do.

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    1. Florence -- Although it was vacant it still was in private ownership. I had a conversation with him and he did not express letting it decay in place. But time changes everything. I do not live there anymore so I don't know what will happen to the building. The town was down on its heels from the recession when I took the photo. -- thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  3. Not knowing it's surroundings, I'd have to go with eyesore. If the surrounding buildings have been politely rehabbed, it's a shame to let this one dwindle away.

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    1. Joanne -- The surrounding were your typical small town buildings built during their heyday. Quite historic many of them. Ky has several old general stores on their landscape which are vacant or being used for other types of uses. I think it would be grand to have the state historical society document them before they are all gone. -- thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  4. We have such a store, preserved intact and brought to life each weekend in the summer by reenactors, local people from the Minnesota Historical Society. They bring it to life and my grandchildren from Arizona loved it. It is now a gem of local pride. Our neighbors great great grandfather was a founding father of the town that no longer exists shortly before the Civil War...

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    1. troutbirder -- what a grand use for your general store. And to use it as theater for the community is better yet. I think the Minnesota Society deserves an award for this project. You have some great history going in your area! -- thanks for your comment.

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  5. I think it needs a new owner with the money and the will and taste to turn it into whatever the town needs, maybe a community center, maybe some kind of store, or ... I don't know. I love to see old places repurposed.

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    1. June -- read troutbirder's comment above as to what the Minnesota Historical Society has done with an old general store. I think repurpose is a great idea. Money helps these old places as does a community that values its history. -- thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  6. Hi Barbara. It's a lovely photo, & I too love the blues. It seems like an American icon, yes? I used to have such an attraction for the old general stores. Have you seen the one at the Smithsonian? It's been years, but I used to love it when I was a teenager. And as I remember, part of it was a real working post office.

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    1. Rita -- I have been to the "huge" track of land with buildings many years ago -- I don't recall seeing a general store. But as I was raised in Michigan I often spent time roaming around Greenfield Village which was full of historic buildings. Greenfield Village was developed by Henry Ford. It did have a general store on its grounds similar to what you describe you loved about the Smithsonian. Now that I think about it perhaps Ford's general store has had some bearings on my interest today of general stores. thanks -- barbara

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  7. Just needs a banjo-picker on the rocking chair.

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    1. John -- You would be surprised as to how many active banjo pickers are present in KY. I think that would be something I would see sitting on a porch like this. thanks John -- barbara

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  8. The Big Yellow Taxi came to mind...'We don't know what we've got til its gone'. So even if only your photograph remains as testimony of the buildings existence - some sort of balance is retained. I think I know what I mean Barbara!

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    1. claggle --I am not familiar with the Big Yellow Taxi but I do relate to your quote, "we don't know what we've got til its gone." From as environmental standpoint saving buildings instead of razing them is environmentally sound. But of course recording buildings through oral histories and photos is good secondary info for us to have. thanks for your astute comment -- barbara

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  9. I think it's lovely. There's an old store in our area that looks a little like that one.

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    1. I do believe the South has more old general stores than I have seen in other regions of the country -- thanks -- barbara

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  10. An eyesore? No way...this store (even empty) can only add beauty to any place, I love its rustic look...
    -- Varanasi: on the banks of Ganges

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    1. thanks for the nice words about the old general store. I believe it does add beauty to the place too. -- barbara

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  11. ... and the story starts here, right in that rocker.

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    1. Birdman -- I'd say a new beginning . . . thanks -- barbara

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  12. Keep it well and find a proper us for it. Much too good to tear down.

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    1. RuneE -- yes,, not only do the old timers relish such places but the new generations can appreciate it too. -- thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  13. That was a different time wasn't it. My great grandparents owned a general store outside of Ann Arbor that is still in operation today. We visited it a few years ago when we were in Michigan. Of course now it's all expensive artisan things, but the overall feel is there, old cash register and all.

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    1. Melissa -- Perhaps I have passed your parents general store? I used to spend lots of time around the Ann Arbor area years ago. Of course your great-grandparents general store would be upscale in that area today. Nice that the structure is still original even if the contents aren't. Hope you have taken photos of the place for you and future generations. -- barbara

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