.

.

Monday, May 12, 2014

OLD BROWNSVILLE HOUSE

Old Vernacular Home 
Getting older
Grandfather Tree getting older too.
Found in Oregon

17 comments:

  1. I want to get inside of every one of these. Been in many but it's not quite the same these days because sometimes you kinda gotta sneak in and it seems people may be more protective plus they like their guns even more.

    Still they're out there and if I can I'm going in if it looks inviting enough. Where's this at again? Even if these things are locked window pictures can be surprisingly interesting sometimes.

    It's fun finding place like yours here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One Fly -- I can understand your desire to get inside these old places. When I was young I loved to explore old houses. I knew a woman who liked to do the same and one day her luck ran out and she fell down a deserted well. It was a long recovery for her after she was fished out of the well. So guns aren't the only thing one has to watch out for. Thanks for your comment -- barbara

      Delete
  2. This house appears lived in. The grass is tended, at any rate.
    I'm doing a project for the township now that requires asking permission. I am surprised at the amount of convincing I must do, and it's mostly inertia I'm overcoming.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne -- If you are referring to having permissions to take photos of houses -- it is not necessary if you take them from public property such as a roadway or public sidewalk, etc. -- this is according to laws implemented for the benefit of photojournalists which in turn applies to all photographers. Nice to get permissions but very time consuming. I worked for a large municipality at one time where we would go out on photo assignments of certain parts of the city. Because of this law we did not have to have permission to take photos of houses -- if we shot it from public property. But maybe some municipalities do permissions by choice? I know that you will will practice your street-smart ways about approaching folks. -- thanks

      Delete
  3. Looks to me that Old Vernacular and Grandfather are a bit too close for comfort and there could eventually be some neighbourly conflict between them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John -- Yes, the Old Vernacular and Grandfather do seem a bit close. I wasn't sure if anyone was living in the house but the grass seemed to indicate someone was taking care of it? Sometimes I think a home is vacant because of its condition but later find that some elderly or eccentric folks are living there and are just are getting by. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  4. You are like my daughter whose eyes always drift to the oldest homes as we drive down the road.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your daughter and I would get along quite well. Even when I was young I was attracted to well worn buildings. Perhaps it was because my maternal relatives lived on farms that dated to the 1800s. Their farms intrigued me. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  5. Gorgeous compostion, so rich & textured, honoring old age...
    I just noticed Sal again on the right here & I would like to honor her again...
    She is looking right at us...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rita -- Old age in any form be it plant, rock, or animal is beautiful to me. Elderly trees always fill me with awe. Ahh Sal -- now there was one fantastic dog! Thanks for honoring him again -- he was one of a kind. Thanks for always leaving kind words -- barbara

      Delete
  6. I think I see curtains at the upstairs window. I know people sometimes leave curtains when they move out but this house seems to be inhabited, maybe by that older person as you suggested earlier. It seems both cozy and private with the tree like a protective presence.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. June -- I found this home in a small town in Oregon's Willamette valley. It needed some TLC. Hopefully it will not meet up with bulldozers of developers. It takes lots of money when it gets to this state to bring it back to its former life. thanks for your comment -- barbara

      Delete
  7. I had to look up vernacular home, so I learned something today :) Guess the tree probably shows the home's age!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I always love seeing old houses. Almost looks like it came out of Kentucky.

    ReplyDelete
  9. So pretty. Is that an elm? Could that be?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hattie -- The tree isn't an elm -- I am not sure what type it was -- I'm thinking more along the ornamental line although it doesn't look ornamental in the photo (early spring). Elm are considered almost extinct in this country -- Dutch Elm disease. -- thanks for the comment -- barbara

    ReplyDelete
  11. There is a stand of Dutch elms in downtown Portland in the Park Blocks. Here is the rundown on how Portland is coping with Dutch elm disease.
    http://www.portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/471259

    ReplyDelete