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Sunday, March 9, 2014

SWAN ALONG HOLLER ROAD



Frequently seen along the countryside throughout Madison County, Kentucky during the warm seasons is this vintage style swan planter made of cement. This particular swan planter used to sit on a porch of an elderly man that placed flowers in it every year in memory of his departed wife. He told me the planter was her favorite. This swan sat on his front porch along his curving holler road.

Sometimes material objects that we think of as insignificant in our life can become very significant.



20 comments:

  1. For the last decade of my father's life he wore a battered and faded old cap. My mother hated that cap and often threatened to throw it out. He died four years ago and the old cap still hangs on its hook by the back door; my mother will not hear of it being removed.

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    1. John -- I can totally see your father's cap hanging by the back door and your mother's feelings. We as humans feel the need to remember those we have loved and lost. Having that certain personal item that meant a lot to the deceased is comforting. Wonderful comment -- thanks barbara

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  2. How nice that the man told you the story of his goose planter. That kind of detail is important and often overlooked. People are often more complex than we think they are.

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    1. June -- I agree that folks are usually more complex than we think. We have so many layers that understanding others can be complicated. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  3. I love local-made cement yard art, too! People get molds for statues and planters and birdbaths, and pour the cement in, then sell them at rural stores. In a Tennessee country store, I saw rows of Venus de Milo, their breasts chastely covered by painted-on two-piece bathing suit tops. I have always kicked myself for not stopping immediately to buy one.

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    1. Lisa -- I too love to walk through yards of cement art in these back country places. Something about the types of work and the yard layout reflects the owner. Any time I can talk with a craft-person about the items they sell -- I walk away feeling good. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. What a lovely way to remember a loved one. The bird bath reminds me I have to get a new concrete bowl for mine which cracked this winter.

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    1. Barbara -- Oh those darn cement bird baths can crack in cold weather. I had one that cracked on me and I set it in the soil, filled it with a bit of soil with the lip showing and filled it with chicks and hens plants. thanks -- barbara

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  5. The planter so resembles a ceramic swan dish which belonged to my grandmother which now sits on a shelf in my house. Your planter looks a very dignified and charming individual, well suited for flowers planted in memory of a wife.

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    1. claggle -- I know the type of ceramic dish you are speaking of as I used to see them in homes when I was young. Cement figures were very popular especially in the little country homes that had been in place for generations. thanks for the comment --

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  6. I'm happy that you have so many of these photos from Kentucky to share here.

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    1. Hattie -- I am too. I established quite a large photo archive on KY when I lived there. KY has a treasure trove of subjects. Thanks -- barbaara

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  7. I love the folk art of the by-ways and of the small towns. I wonder what we are leaving behind as memories for our children and grandchildren.

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  8. Joanne -- video games and plastics probably. Unless young adults are introduced to the importance of saving our environment. At least that is what I think. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  9. The swan looks magnificent in your photo, truly grand. And the story makes him all the more special. I was touched by the man's sweet gesture to remember his wife. (& I'm always touched by your attention to such special people.) My dad had made a cement bird bath with the most humorous cement bird in it, & I'd forgotten it all these years until this moment. I guess it got sold with their house & I'm having some poignant feelings about it...& about my dad...so I thank you...

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    1. Rita -- I find that an object is just that -- an object -- until that object gains meaning through our thoughts about it. Your father's birdbath sounds like a piece of folk art. Sometimes those objects can slip away from us as you say in your comment. But I don't think real meaningful objects ever do -- they remain to be recalled when we need them. So many of our life stories are intertwined in meaningful objects. Thanks for the lovely comment -- barbara

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  10. The sentimental swan. How interesting!

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    1. Rubye -- thanks for the comment -- many of us have objects of affection -- barbara

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  11. It's interesting that what must seem like clutter to some are others treasures, thanks for sharing this it is piece that will stick with me all day.

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    1. Sublime Birdy -- To put it in "street" language -- one man's trash is another man's treasure. I guess it has always been this way -- some people have different ways of responding to things. Thanks -- I appreciate your comment -- barbara

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