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Wednesday, March 5, 2014

EARLY HOUSE FIREPLACE -- LANCASTER KENTUCKY


Early crafted fireplace

Lancaster has many early historic homes in original condition. Above is a finely crafted fireplace that dates to around the early to mid 1800s at which time this fireplace would have been crafted by local craftsmen out of virgin timber. I am amazed at the beauty of the workmanship -- cove moldings, shadows of original dental moldings, and line carvings. 

Revealing the underlying historic paint colors on the fireplace can help preservation efforts in choosing the appropriate paints for the fireplace.

At the time I took this photo the whole house was undergoing some preservation work giving it a fresh vitality. Nice to know this fireplace will be remaining to keep the new occupants cozy.


22 comments:

  1. This is very interesting to me who has just spent some time at Mass. Institute of Technology & in a city of girders & steel (among which old buildings still stand, rather dwarfed) ...I'm glad this early "technology" that you show, so human, so full fo spirit & beauty is being preserved. So often people just zap it down & clear it away for current modes...Thanks, as always, for sharing, Barbara.

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    1. Rita -- thankfully this charming town has a benevolent local bank that selects a structure or two every year to resuscitate back to life. All the rescued buildings are historic but not always the most stylish. They seem to be based on soul rather than on wealth.Your visit to Mass. Institute of Technology sounds interesting. thanks for visiting -- barbara

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  2. Curiously, today brought me long-disappeared Wordpress notice of this post--but linked to November last year. Whatever, have not been visiting your lovely images often enough. The fireplace mantle seems almost a duplicate of the one in our Baltimore house built in 1920. Painted ours red when we began our time there 1971--as only third owner. Many wonderful times with great flames and a bit too much smoke.

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    1. Your 1920 house with a fireplace similar to the one in my photo tells me that your home was of a better quality, style-wise, than most of the middle-class homes I am familiar with from that period. I too lived in a 20s bungalow for a few years and loved all the wood trim that was used in the house. I plan on writing a post on the house that the fireplace resides in in the near future. thanks -- barbara

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  3. Oh, the work of removing years of paint from those tiny spaces!

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    1. Joanne -- me thinks that you have done a bit of refinishing with your remark that you leave. I did my bit toward refinishing when I was younger -- not anymore! thanks -- barbara

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  4. Your insight and capture amazes me. I just love how those textures just jump out at you with layers of paint and the brick along with the carving in the wood. Good photo, thanks for sharing

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    1. Diane -- Personally I would not remove or cover any of the original paint on the fireplace that you see in my photo. To me old colors are a visual of time and bring out the reality of the piece. thank you for the nice words -- barbara

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  5. I am so glad it is going to be restored. It is so beautiful.

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    1. Birdie -- This house is being preserved as a home in Lancaster by the local bank. They have preserved many of the wonderful old structures in the town. -- barbara

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  6. Another great picture. Very tactile, bricks (different sizes = age?), wood, plaster (?) and lovely gorgeous peeling paint. A study of past glory? Seems like it is still in working order, wood or coal.

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    1. claggle -- This fireplace resides in a house that I was always attracted to -- not that it was a show-stopper but rather one that was early and rather down-in-the-dumps. I have a bit of info and photos on this house that I will do another post on in the future. the bricks are early and probably manufactured either at the house when it was built or somewhere nearby. I talked with a man that works on historic masonry and he looked at some of the bricks in the house and assured me they were original to the date of the house. I believe you are a person that knows an old original house when you see one. thanks for stopping. -- barbara

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  7. Amazing how much handwork went into making everyday objects and how much such beauty was valued in the past.

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    1. John -- I am most amazed at the historic architecture that you usually show on your posts. We live in such a different time-frame now. thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  8. Amazing that the wood has held up so well.

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    1. Hattie -- Yes, I agree the patina and features are still there for us to enjoy. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  9. It's wonderful that you capture the details so beautifully with your photo. The care of the carvings, an their gracefulness is a deilght to see. I'm happy others will be able to appreciate this work.

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    1. June -- I live in an apartment today that is considered nice but when I look at its features I conclude that they just don't build like they used to -- with lasting craftsmanship that is -- thanks -- barbara

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  10. Such a beauty, even in this state!

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    1. Vicki -- It is nice that so many folks can appreciate good craftsmanship today. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  11. What wonderful lines here. So happy to know it's being restored to another glory.

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    1. Birdman -- I am with you -- I like to see a good piece of craftsmanship saved. -- thanks -- barbara

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