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Monday, April 9, 2012

WILD GARDEN


I am not a poet. But sometimes words are produced when I look at certain objects. I don't really write the words. Something in my sub-conscience does. They just tumble out from the faucet of my mind. I took this photo a couple days ago for no apparent reason. Today when I looked at it I saw the inequities that abound in our country. My mind wrote the words in caps -- I think it was because emotionally I felt the critical drama that is being played out in our country. 



A WILD GARDEN GROWS NEAR MY SMALL WOODLANDS.

REMINDING ME.

SOME FOLKS ABHOR THE BLOOMS AND SEED PUFF BALLS THAT ARISE

THEY ARE SURVIVORS BEING SWORE AT AND CHEMICALLY SPRAYED.

THEY ARE IMMIGRANTS TO OUR LAND.

BUT CHILDREN LOVE THEM. MAKING SING-SONG AND DANDELION NECKLACES.

CHILDREN OF INNOCENCE WITHIN OUR MAD WORLD.

~ ~ barbara





23 comments:

  1. Beautiful!!! I have a soft spot foe dandelions -- they are happy weeds!!!!

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  2. Kay, glad you find beauty in dandelions as do I. Thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  3. I've got those beauties in my yard too....I saw a man pulling his son in a red wagon down our street...the little boy had captured a handful of dandelions to take back to mom after their trip...I know she'll be thrilled to receive this precious gift from her son. Mel

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    1. Mel -- I too think his mom will be thrilled to receive the bouquet of dandelions. Children have such innate visions of beauty. thanks -- barbara

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  4. I dreamed of dandelions growing in the crack of a sidewalk, yellow and blue flowers. Your poem reminded me of my surprise at the blue ones. Again, don't know where that image came from, but it fits your parallel to our culture as well. Thanks.

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    1. Barbara -- I find dreams fascinating. I do think they are from the sub-conscious -- giving us symbolic thoughts. For me, very complex to understand but I think taking the effort to understand is worthwhile. Interesting comment. Thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  5. The purest kinds of poems and truest expressions come in a rush when emotions have to find words. That is a very find poem and says so much so simply we can all understand -- tho' I'm a bit pessimistic about the dandelion haters who seem so trapped in the "ought-a" of what society has decreed is appropriate. We call them weeds but many have made salads from their leaves and even wine (which I tried to make once with undrinkable results). All this unusually warm winter I was cheered by tiny dandelions with almost no stalks that bloomed in a sheltered sunny spot on the lawn. That bit of golden life make me smile many days.

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    1. June. Such a nice comment coming from one who teaches writing -- makes me feel good. You hit the nail on its head in your description of what the poem was saying. In a way one could say the weeds are the innocents along with the children. I feel that we have lost our way in so many areas of respecting our natural world. thanks -- barbara

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  6. Very true commentary on the state of our country. I thought it was perfect for the photograph.

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  7. NCmountainwoman -- Thanks for the nice comment. I feel we are in a complex state of affairs here in the U.S. -- barbara

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  8. Immigrants also have their rights. These ones will come to my garden too in a little while. I'll remember your words.

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  9. RuneE -- Yes, and immigrants do have rights. How nice that you will remember my words when your dandelions arrive -- their yellow blooms make me smile. -- barbara

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  10. Enjoyed the poem. Fun way to garden too! Run around and kick the puffballs and watch the seeds fly.

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    1. Grampy -- Your puffballs will become your garden using your described gardening trick. Lots of early greens as a result -- for your salad pleasure. Mix with those dead nettles you show on your post and you'll really get a healthy kick. -- barbara

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  11. The Swiss do not remove dandelions from the meadows where cows graze. The children love to make garlands of the flowers. In spring, dandelions greens are prized.
    In America they are weeds.

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    1. Hattie -- Around here in KY the cows eat the wild fields that seem to keep them healthy -- I imagine dandelions are in the mix. Will take a look at the one across the lane from me. I wonder if the Swiss remove them from their home landscapes -- Mansanto is mind conditioning the world to use Round-Up -- as I am sure you know. thanks -- barbara

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  12. Birdman -- AHHH - I'm a bit slow today but now I get it -- thanks -- barbara

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  13. What a good example of perception and how it forms our worldview. It's fun, when these ideas, images and words all come together so well, as they did here.

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    1. Teresa -- Thank you. I enjoy your subject matter on your posts. You can reach so deep in your thoughts and bring them up -- spilling into a wonderful essay. -- barbara

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  14. Wonderful picture -- I see why you were inspired!

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  15. Vicki --Lots of salad fix-in's -- thanks -- barbara

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  16. Kudos to you for sharing the picture of dandelions and your poem about them. I always say, none of us should grow too old to pick a bouquet of dandies. Why these yellow beauties got classified as weeds, I'll never know. Maybe those of us who appreciate them have been in their place and that's why we understand.

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