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Tuesday, April 17, 2012

SMALL VACANT HOMESTEAD



One wonders how long this home has been vacant as it sits aside a fairly busy road in Garrard County, Kentucky. Its weather beaten posture stands fairly straight as vines surround it like a boa chocking the life of its prey.



The house reflects its date of construction -- the early twentieth century when times were either tough or really good. During this time period bungalows were house models being pushed by many construction companies. In fact you could even buy them from Sears and Roebuck in a kit for you to assemble on your land.



This homestead was always a small operation as reflected by the unassuming barn. Now totally being taken over by weeds it still maintains its dignity as does the house. It probably was built with virgin white oak that was a popular building material  during the early twentieth century in Kentucky. White oak is an extremely durable building material that withstands years of abuse from the weather.


I call this outbuilding a chicken coop although I am not certain of its use. Many times, over the years, uses of outbuildings would change. Oral histories of family members that lived in the house would be a way to find out how it was used.



After I had walked a little on the property I looked up and saw a sign that told me I might be in trouble soon. It was a no trespassing sign. I hurried out to my truck and left quickly. I always respect those signs and completely missed it when I was taking photos just a few feet into the property. At least I didn't get any buckshot in my "you know what" as I was leaving.





14 comments:

  1. Thanks for great photos of buildings that housed families; where people once laughed, ate, slept and loved...their entire dramas now floating into the ether or residing wherever they have moved to. Remembering how the buildings were constructed is the beginning of the stories we can only imagine. I love these!
    And I have made some clay triple spirals...so am so glad to see you also have it here on your site!

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    1. Barbara -- Are you Irish -- the triple spiral on my blog is from Neolithic Ireland. How is the triple spiral used in your work? I liked your insight into the families who possibly lived in the house on my post. My father was an Irish storyteller so I zone in with people that can spin a yarn from a material object. -- thanks -- barbara

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  2. I'm sure it has stories to tell.

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    1. Birdman -- I do agree with you -- it surely has many to tell and wouldn't it be nice to know. -- thanks -- barbara

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  3. Love the photos!!!! A friend/acquaintance lives in an absolutely gorgeous, perfectly restored, Sears, Roebuck house only a few blocks from me.

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    1. Kay -- Well getting all involved with taking the photos was how I missed the sign on the house. But all ended well -- no buckshot. There were many companies like Sears that sold the house kits. Since you like Sears kit homes You probably would enjoy this blog titled Sears Modern Homes. the link is http://www.searshomes.org/ -- thanks -- barbara

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  4. When I see an abandoned house I always think of the poem that said, "But a house that has done what a house should do...is the saddest thing when left alone that ever your eyes could meet." Sorry you were trespassing, but glad you got the photographs.

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    1. NCmountainwoman -- How true are the words from the line of your poem. I have always loved architecture and especially the vrernacular types. I used to wander through abandoned houses when I was young -- it was and still is rather spiritual.-- thanks -- barbara

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  5. I see many of these structures in my county. Always sad to see them in a state of disrepair. I always wonder about their history.

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    1. Michelle -- Sometimes I make up one to fit the house. I used to take my kids through old vacant houses and we would talk about it for hours later on -- who could have lived there, what did they do for entertainment, were they friendly etc. Fun game for them. I can tell that you are a fan of buildings from some of the nice posts you write about them -- thanks -- barbara

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  6. Love those old houses and the stories they silently tell...

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    1. Robert -- So many of these abandoned houses will fall, unfortunately without a whisper of their stories. thanks -- barbara

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  7. I love taking pictures of old homesteads, but in more recent years they almost always have "No Trespassing" signs on them and it's a shame. So many farmsteads could be saved, at least in photographs. I've done a similar thing with my friend, JB. We would actually sit on the furniture they left behind and imagine, or sit quietly and just feel what was, and in many ways still is.

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    1. Teresa, You are so right -- photographs designated with location can become part of the cultural housing stock puzzle for future archivists. Development also plays a significant role in the disappearance of our cultural baggage. I had my eye on a late 1700s house to photograph that was "scraped" before I got back to photograph it. Old houses, and farms seem to be disappearing at record rates in this area. -- thanks -- barbara

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