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Thursday, February 16, 2012

VINTAGE SEED CATALOGS

Garden planting time is drawing near. I don't plan on planting a garden this year as I am busy getting ready to move. But, I still appreciate all things gardening, especially seed catalog graphics. 


Below are some catalogs that I picked up years ago. For a look at 10,000 more seed and nursery catalogs check out the Smithsonian Institution's collection.  It includes trade catalogs from 1830 to the present. 


I wonder how many of you still subscribe to seed catalogs? If you do what are your favorite catalogs. Or do you buy online, or buy both -- from catalogs and online for seeds? Maybe you buy plants or seeds at stores or save seeds? 


L. L. OLDS SEED CO. 1941
ALFRED J. BROWN SEED CO. 

FRONT COVER OF MILLS SEED HOUSE 1913
BACK COVER OF MILLS SEED HOUSE 1913
W. ATLEE BURPEE CO 1942

SOW SALZER'S SEEDS


10 comments:

  1. I remember these. My father always had new seed catalogs and I guess we loved looking at them mostly because of the colors.

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  2. Rubye -- I think that is what draws folks to seed catalogs is the colored graphics as well as the seed varieties. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  3. I love the graphics on these vintage catalogs. Something about looking at a seed catalog that has so much promise in it.

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    1. Michelle -- good way to put it -- seed catalogs representing promise -- thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  4. We enjoy the catalogs but mostly get our seed from the local co-op. One funny catalog story on my father-in-law. He ordered a plant called a Topeperato. When he gets the package it is a potato slice with a hole in the center and a tomato and pepper seed to plant inside the potato slice. We laughed at him for years for ordering this exotic vegetable plant.

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  5. Grampy -- sounds like a bit of trickery for your father-in-law. Co-ops are great. Wish we had one in this area. I guess we used too but for some unknown reason to me it disbanded -- barbara

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  6. I'm not much of a gardener, but I appreciate very much the value of those old catalogues you show here. They represent a part of our cultural heritage that all too often gets lost on our way into the future.

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    1. RuneE -- Perhaps it is better if we treat the past as building blocks rather than landfill. I appreciate your very valid comment. -- barbara

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  7. How did I miss these? They are beautiful and so is what they represent. I can't wait to look through the latest catalog. It's like reading recipe books. I may not make everything, but the vicarious experience is wonderful!

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    1. Teresa -- I especially like the old catalogs with their lithographic covers rather than photos. I wish that I could enjoy cooking more -- good cooking is what I consider an art.

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