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Tuesday, February 21, 2012

CREEK BRIDGE REMOVAL


BRIDGE SPAN BEAMS

Riding along rural roads you are apt to run into all kinds of situations. 

While travelling down one of my local one lane roads, I came to a halt by the deconstruction of a wooden bridge. This was literally the end of the road for me. I got out of my truck and took a few photos as I was amazed at the size of the old lumber that was being removed.  

OLD CROSSWISE BRIDGE PLANKS THROWN ASIDE
The construction was pretty basic. Under the spam beams were metal sheaths aligned flat against each side of the banks. The beams rested on the upper lips of the metal sheaths -- this was their only support. Thick planks had laid crosswise on the beams but were now removed and were thrown off to the side of the road. No side rails for this bridge.  I guessed the span was about as long as a large truck. That was it. A rather primitive road-bridge but serving the public to cross over the creek.

CREEK FLOWING UNDER BEAMS RESTING ON METAL SHEATH LIP
The creek was flowing low beneath the bridge. It looked rather small to me but probably in a good downpour it could gather itself and rise. 

I had no choice but to turn around and head back toward a main road. A truck was coming the other way and pulled over to let me pass by. I paused as I passed to question the man driving -- asking why the bridge was being taken apart. By coincidence, the man worked for the county and he told me the bridge was being replaced by a cement one. 

I later thought that the old bridge looked like it had many years left in it. But what do I know about the viability of wooden bridge construction.  

10 comments:

  1. I wish there was a way to maintain the historical integrity of these bridges. Cement just isn't the same. What an intriguing road....

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    1. Agree completely with you. I am always amazed that in the name of "better" we lose so much. thanks -- barbara

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  2. You never see wood that size anymore. A bit of a shame. I like the old wood bridges.

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    1. The beams and planks were huge. I asked the county man what they were going to do with all of the bridge materials and he said probably landfill them -- I certainly hope he was wrong. Thanks -- barbara

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  3. I am so enjoying your photos on both blogs....
    so atmospheric and quite quite impressive

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  4. John -- Thanks for stopping by both of my blogs. Like the sound of the word you used "atmospheric." Had to look it up -- the closest meaning was; creating a distinctive mood such as nostalgia. I will remember the word and attempt to use it. Carry on in Wales. -- barbara

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  5. Were there no signs telling you the bridge was out? Looks like, even on a one lane, little used road that could be quite a surprise -- oh-oh! And where to turn around? There doesn't seem to be much room? You prove again and again that driving back roads with a sense of curiosity also involves a sense of adventure.

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  6. JUNE -- Glad you asked about a "bridge under construction" sign. I have to admit this -- but there was a sign quite a ways from the bridge that said bridge out. I didn't spot it until I was on my way back out to the main road. I think I was distracted by the neat farm across the road from the sign. But there was no chance I would have gone onto the bridge beams as there was a stretch of orange cones and another metal long stand behind the cones just before the bridge. As far as turning around on narrow roads -- I always park where I know I can turn around and then walk to the area I am interested in. In this case there was a tractor pull-out near by. Thanks June -- for your comments -- barbara

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    1. Barbara,
      Another delightful visit to your blog. It makes me happy to see these old timey rural scenes. I love your photos and your observations.
      Gaea

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    2. Thanks Gaea -- Such nice words. Much of my early years were spent on and around farms -- perhaps that is why I like to blog about it -- barbara

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