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Friday, July 1, 2011

HISTORIC UNINCORPORATED COMMUNITY -- KIRKSVILLE, KENTUCKY

MAIN STREET -- KIRKSVILLE, KENTUCKY
Unincorporated Kentucky communities are places that are rooted in tradition and/or history. . They are places where the residents know the boundaries. They have no formally organized government. 


Kirksville is an unincorporated place that is surrounded by historic farms. Older homes along the curving main street reflect a rich texture of country living.


I could not find  population statistics for the community and maybe that is the way it should be. Everybody knows each other and everybody counts so there is no need for  official data..

14 comments:

  1. I know of some small rural communities that are unincorporated but known locally as "wide places in the road." It looks like Kirville isn't very wide, but in your photo looks very bucolic and serene.

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  2. Delightful! I can even hear the birds singing!
    Does the train whistle blow? Around here, the train used to take people shopping...and bring them back home the same day.

    Lovely, as usual, Barbara!
    Elora

    PS--Blogger now in the comment department is jet-speed! Wow! Never had it so fast!

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  3. Places like this are wonderful here in Kentucky. Much a throw back to earlier times when everyone knew everyone in the community.

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  4. Elora -- I guess congratulations are in order on your comments. How did you make it happen? No train. Some small towns around here once had train service for such things as going to the next town but that is history. Thanks -- barbara

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  5. Farmchick -- As a relatively newcomer to Ky I feel everyone around this area does know their neighbor plus the whole area. This area is really not transitional so folks have lived here for generations. Eventually through time they seem to have a passing acquaintance with most of our local folks. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  6. June -- I am not familiar with the term, "wide places in the road." It must be an old term. I will file it away for future reference as it surely is a folk term. Thanks -- barbara

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  7. Love little communities like that; there so rare in this day and time.

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  8. MamaBug -- I agree with you that small communities like this are getting lost to development. Hopefully, not all will be lost. They add such rich texture to an area. Thanks -- barbara

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  9. Looks like a pretty little village.

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  10. We have communities like that in Ohio, too.

    I like them.

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  11. I love that idyllic spot. The road is especially welcoming. The telephone poles have been climbed a million times. Everything is preserved as if in amber. BTW, saw a giant spider web in the garden this morning. I think she is aiming to catch one of those bees. Dianne

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  12. Hi Dianne -- It is an idyllic spot. Oh, do you think a big spider lives in the web. I have a large gauzy web on my truck antenna. It runs all the way over to my side view mirror. I find its delicacy beautiful and refuse to sweep it away. My friend from Michigan called such webs science projects -- to be left alone -- I guess I have picked up a bit of her thnking. --- barbara

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  13. Sheri -- you use an appropriate label for such a place -- a village. Could also be called a hamlet.
    Thanks for stopping by - barbara

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  14. Kay -- the non-commercial parts of Ohio are very charming. I lived in Ohio for a short period of time and my maternal folks are from northern Ohio. -- barbara

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