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Tuesday, July 5, 2011

GRAY TREE FROG -- MEMBER OF MY EVENING CHORUS

Gray Tree Frog -- Hyla versicolor

Since early April I have been serenaded by tree frogs. Their melodic croaks begin as dusk turns to night. For awhile I timed when the Carolina Wrens stopped singing in the evening and when the tree frogs started up their chorus. It was interesting that within minutes of the wrens signing off the frogs started up. It was almost as if they had an agreement to keep nature's songs in the air.


Of course with a good rain shower during the daytime the frogs belt out a few crocks.  


In the above photo you'll notice the small Gray Tree Frog sitting on the ledge of my outdoor electrical outlet box. He sat there yesterday, very still, yet his eyes appeared watchful. 


The tree frog is native to the United States and is only about 1.5 to 2 inches at maturity. The female does not croak -- only the male. (yes, one could get several jokes out of that last statement)


Frogs eat a diverse diet of both beneficials and non-beneficials in our gardens. Some of their favorite foods are algae, amphibians, insects, spiders, mites, plant lice, harvestmen, and snails.  


Frogs depend on bogs, swamps, and lakes for their life cycles. All of nature benefits from healthy streams, bogs, swamps, and lakes. And, as we are nature, so is the Gray Tree Frog. Both depending on healthy water.



RESOURCES:


1) University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, Tree Frog


2) eNature.com Gray Tree Frog Croak

14 comments:

  1. I do not hear tree frogs where I live although a friend whose home is in a less urbanized area tells me there are lots of them around. Interestingly just yesterday I read a fine riff on what seems to be a Japanese cousin of the American tree frog from a blogger I read regularly. His frogs, he says, are shy and individualistic but they croak and are plentiful in his mountainous area. He's American and possibly assumes they are the same species he knnw as a boy in the US. I remember them from growing up as one of the vey soothing sounds of summer.

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  2. Barbara,
    We had a tree frog take up residence in a small decorative birdhouse on the porch. When a thunderstorm would turn loose the rain he would let loose with a few loud croaks each time. It got where I would anticipate the croaking after hearing the raindrops pounding through the maple tree leaves above him. When I would look out the frog would be peering out of the hole in the birdhouse.. Happy as a frog I spose.

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  3. June -- Nice to get info abut nature from other spots around the world as well as our home ports. I feel there is no other way to go to sleep than to have a quiet dark house and an open window -- listening to the frogs. I find that they stop croaking about midnight. Interesting, the rhythms of animal behavior. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. Grampy -- I'm sure he was as happy as he could be in that decorative birdhouse. I like that he peered out the entrance hole. You being a fantastic photographer -- I hope you caught some pics of the frog peering out. Nice to have a comment from you -- barbara

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  5. I miss the frogs and haven't seen a toad or turtle in years, Sniff. Nice piece Babrara, and I like your new photo of yourself too. Is it my imagination, or are you looking more contemplative these dasys?

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  6. I have always loved the sound of frogs singing! Maybe I need to move to the country!

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  7. Kay -- the frogs are tremendous relaxers -- you can sleep well in the country -- barbara

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  8. Dianne -- the photo of me was taken a couple of years ago. I was very relaxed when the photo was taken. When are you going to put up a fairly recent photo of yourself? Maybe you like anonymity -- you could put on sunglasses if that is the case. I do like your sweet garden girl photo.
    -- barbara

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  9. Aww, what a cutie...he blends in quite well there. I love the sound of frogs and crickets...but we don't get either of them around here in the city, and also because I don't think it's warm enough around here for crickets....but I'm not sure.

    How lucky to be serenaded both day and night with the wrens and the frogs, very relaxing.

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  10. Very nice post, Barbara. Around here, the Gray Treefrogs are the third to start singing in the spring, after the Wood Frogs and the Spring Peepers.

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  11. I love listening to the frogs! We have come across some tiny frogs around our house lately. You only see them when they are startled and hop.

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  12. Janet -- at eNature.com you can hear a recording of them. Fun.

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  13. Rose -- if you have a garden a resident frog will keep a lot of insect under control. Thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  14. Sheri -- You have a great sense of nature's rhythms. To be so in tune with the critters, wildflowers and all must give you great pleasure. -- barbara

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