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Tuesday, February 8, 2011

VINTAGE CORN CRIB

WIRE MESH CORN CRIB

I noticed this storage structure on a very small abandoned farm. I really was unsure of its use and so, of course, I roamed around the internet to see what I could put together. Well, finally I deduced that it was a a crib used to store corn. I figured one could store a heck of a lot of it in this metal structure. 


The closest I could date this vintage corn crib, as to when it might have been used, was perhaps early to mid-twentieth century. The little one-story farm house on the property was probably of the 1920s. I figured that, as a farm, I was looking at one that was viable during the early to mid 1900s. 


Apparently these storage cribs are going out of fashion as some people are buying them off  farms and transporting them home to be turned into gazebos. I figure that is a recycling plus for these hard working old ladies of the farm.

25 comments:

  1. I have to admit that I wished we had one of these on our farm. Nice piece of history.

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  2. Interesting and very different that the one at my grandparents' farm in Wisconsin. I hid in it more than a few times when the cousins played Hide and Seek. Farms are wondrous places for such things.

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  3. Modern day corn cribs haven't changed a bit in the design from back then, Barbara. In fact, we built a brand new one on our farm long ago, and when we went out of the commercial farming business, we sold the wire part to someone who would re-erect it on their farm. The round concrete pad, though, is still there today and it's a favorite haunt for a few of our local black snakes!

    Elora

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  4. Quite different from the vintage corn crib we have on our farm -- ours is wooden and holds far less.

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  5. Vicki you have one of those old wood corn cribs that are so beautiful -- wonderful. -- barbara

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  6. Farmchick -- Since you live in Ky -- do you see many of this type in your area? -- barbara

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  7. Elora -- Interesting. Perhaps this type of corn crib is still being produced? The latest style that I came across was a prefab steel one. Didn't know you two were commercial farmers at one time. Would love to know more about that part of your life on the farm. What a great life you two have led. -- barbara

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  8. Kay, You are right -- farms for kids are such a rich experience. Lots of outdoor fun, places to hide, barn ropes to swing from the rafters, apples to pick, tractors to ride and all else that goes with it. Great to have those types of memories -- barbara

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  9. Hmm. Would make a good bird cage for large fowl. I'm starting to wonder about all the abandoned farms you seem to have around you.

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  10. Sheri -- What a good idea, a large bird cage. Your comment did bring back a memory of an eagle living in just this type of structure -- it was in an arboretum. The story was he couldn't fly. Sad to see such a magnificent bird in a cage.

    Why so many abandoned farms in this area you say. I have some thoughts. Most of these farms are on hilly areas that large corporate farms would not be interested in purchasing. Secondly, most small-time farmers cannot survive in this corporate farming society, and lastly developers hold the lands as investments and let the farms decay. One more thought -- new home McMansions built on farm land -- far enough away from the original farm -- that they can let it die a slow death. Just saw an entire farm decaying with outbuildings and house while up by the road sat a nice newer ranch type house. These thoughts are just my ramblings. I get the feeling that the old farm society is fast disappearing in Kentucky. Thanks for the interesting comment -- barbara

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  11. That's a really neat corncrib Barbara; don't think I've seen any made of wire in our area. Just metal or wood. Love the new header.

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  12. Mama-Bug -- Perhaps there are not any in your part of Florida because the farms are not growing corn? I very seldom see any of the old wire cribs. The old farming landscapes are disappearing. Thanks for the comment and also your words on the header -- barbara

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  13. Interesting, I've never seen a corn crib. Thanks for introducing me to them...you must live in a wonderfully beautiful part of the country.

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  14. Rose, Corn cribs come in all shapes and all materials. Kentucky is a beautiful state. In my travels I have discovered that there many beautiful states in our country. I like your idea of having a CSA. I have not reached vegan-ism yet but maybe someday. I am a vegetarian and have been for many years. I love all the recipes you feature on your blog. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  15. Barbara, in the area we lived in near Toronto, which was very rocky, a lot of marginal farmland has been abandoned, but not too many houses seem to be left behind. Perhaps the colder climate requires more sturdy building materials? Especially where Scots settled, there are a lot of stone houses that are highly valued today. Falling down barns are fairly common. Of course, lots of starter castles are built on country lots here too, and that disturbing oxymoron, the rural subdivision! Interesting to compare regions.

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  16. That corn crib almost looks like a piece of art. And I immediately started thinking like a bird, figuring how I could snag myself a few corn kernels by pecking on the stored cobs through the wire mesh. :-)

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  17. I am always amazed at all of the wonderful photos you take of old farmsteads and their outbuildings...they are fantastic! Found your comment to Sheri about why so many farms are abandoned in your area interesting. Sure that probably applies to the rest of the nation as well.

    I see lots of old barns in my area of PA but they all appear to be in use. Converted to a school, house, doctor's offices, or stores.

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  18. On a fine, still, warm morning it would make a lovely writing-hut.

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  19. I like the corn crib. I also thought of a large bird cage when I saw it. I don't think I have seen any of those around here.

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  20. blueoran -- Yes, I can envision it used in your way. Circular is always inviting. -- barbara

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  21. Janet -- I look at it as a disappearing piece of small farming culture. Perhaps that is why you have not seen any. Thanks -- barbara

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  22. Hi Barbara:

    Interesting post and picture. You don't see many corn cribs around these parts, but I have seen a few. I have plans to build my own corn crib (much smaller than in your picture)in the next year or two since it would be cheaper and more efficient to purchase field corn unshucked, store it, and feed it like that to the animals than purchase commercial feed already ground up. Plus, I don't know what was put on the corn and how it was grown, something I would know if I bought local.

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  23. I just purchased one to use as a peacock enclosure.

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  24. We have a corn bin just like this on our farm that we have turned into a gazebo. My son is getting married there in June. https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Corn-Bin/135125866629049

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  25. We had one on the farm I grew up on! It was right next to a big wooden corn crib and I'm pretty sure that's where they dried the corn out. My sister and I used to climb up the inside of the thing to the top. Several years ago, my dad dismantled it and now all that's left is the concrete base. I'm not sure what he did with the wire sides or door, though.

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