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Monday, February 22, 2016

JOINING A COMMUNITY GARDEN



Community gardener harvesting a bit of greens from his plot.

Last November I decided to join a community garden here in town where I now live. There were a few spots available of both small and large plots. These plots were available for a twenty-five dollar donation no matter the size. I opted for the small size -- figured I could handle it better considering my ancient age.



After I paid my donation I took a stroll through the garden. All the plots had been pretty much bedded down for the winter. But I did spy something of interest to me. A tree stump that was being used as a sitting stool in the corner of one of the gardens spots. Why was the stump of interest to me? It was the sapsucker holes that surrounded the stump forming circular rows up and down the whole piece. I saw it as an example of nature's art in the garden created by a Red-Headed Sapsucker.


Here is a close up of the stump. View this excellent article (lots of fantastic photos) by Bird Note of the Western Red-Headed Sapsucker doing the things that Sapsuckers do. The most interesting part of this article is their relationship with hummingbirds. Enjoy.



28 comments:

  1. How interesting. We have sapsuckers, too, if we can catch them on their migration. I never have. I am motivated to take my camera tomorrow to take a picture of a tree just decimated by the palliateds. It is see through.

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    1. Joanne -- Would like to see the tree decimated by your Pileated woodpeckers. Pileateds are fascinating to watch. I read that they usually don't go after the healthy trees but do go after the diseased or injured trees. If so I figure that is nature's way of taking care of the forest. thanks -- barbara

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  2. What a good idea to join the community garden! Have you decided what to plant come Spring?

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    1. Florence -- In November when I signed up for the community garden I planted some native wild flower seeds. One type of seeds was called Scarlet Gilia (Ipomopsis aggregata). And another native wild flower Blazing Star (Mentzelia laevicaulis). Both of these plants were unfamiliar with me but I like to try out new plants. The packet stated I could plant the seed from September through December. Hope they come up this spring. Also plan on planting sunflowers and heritage zinnias called State Fair that grow 3 to 4 feet tall.
      Like the concept of community gardens.

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  3. Oooh, how great you're gardening this year! Loved the sapsucker photos on that link, and I learned a lot I'd never heard about them. Are you buying seeds already?

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    1. Barbara -- I remember that you were thinking about signing up for a community garden. Are you going to sign up for one? I have joined several community gardens in the different places where I have lived. Great meeting gardeners and learning from them in a social garden situation. I have bought my seeds and planted a few that can survive winter. My garden is very small so I have to contain myself from going crazy on buying seeds. Glad you liked the link -- barbara

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  4. We have a yellow-bellied here and I am still trying to get a good photo.

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    1. Tabor -- Nice if you can catch a shot of the yellow-bellied. They can move fast around and up a tree. At least that has been my experience. Thanks -- barbara

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  5. I love community gardens too. Good exercise, good food, and a chance to meet new friends...:)

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    1. troutbirder -- I can use the exercise for sure. I expect to cram the small plot full without an inch to spare. Sounds like you are very familiar with community gardens. thanks -- barbara

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  6. How fascinating the holes on the stump are, and how very observant and knowledgeable of you to know what made them.

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    1. June -- There are so many ways to enjoy nature. For me is to identify animal's behaviors and earth's offerings. I'd rather do this than go shopping. thanks -- barbara

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  7. Great spotting :) You're going to have a lot of fun with that garden this summer. I've got a few raised beds in my new backyard, and currently planning my garden too. Anticipating spring.

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    1. I've gotten away from gardening in the last few years. I used to have very large gardens. I am looking forward to my very small garden though. thanks -- barbara

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  8. That is so cool! Nature is the best artist.

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    1. Hattie -- Yes nature is a terrific artist. thanks -- barbara

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  9. I have a yellow belly sapsucker who comes around quite a bit but mostly at my suet holder and not the tree, for which I am thankful for as it is still alive. Love how you spot these interesting things to photograph for us. Thanks

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    1. Dianne -- In doing some research on sapsuckers I found it is unusual for them to bother healthy trees only those that suffer from damage such as a disease.
      -- barbara

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  10. Something I've always wanted to do, and now that I have an invalid husband I must care for the garden myself and enjoying it.

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    1. Carole Ann -- Gardening is so rewarding. I imagine you are planting both flowers and veggies. -- thanks -- barbara

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  11. Looks like the best seat in town. Your post made me want to kick some dirt around. That's a good thing...

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  12. Very fascinating. those birds...I'm so glad for you that you have this community garden...It's about gardening and about community, so nice. I love the top photo of the migrating birds...I see that you identify with them...

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  13. Nice post. I went to that site, he has great pics of birds. We had a pine tree that we had grown from just a sapling. It was brought home from school when the kids were young. When it got old, it had those circles of holes all around it made by a sapsucker. The extension agent said it was dying when that happened.

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  14. Not sure why your blog was thrown off my blogrole. I appreciate this new venue into a communal gardening project. Nothing better for the soul than gardening.

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  15. The community garden sounds like a great way to meet like-minded folks. We have sapsuckers here and the evidence is everywhere.

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  16. Interesting! We had a pine tree that had rows and rows of the sap-sucker holes in the trunk. Sorry to say, the pine soon died. Have fun gardening!

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  17. Ours here are the yellow bellied variety but the pattern of their drilling is quite the same....:)

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