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Monday, May 25, 2015

NELSON COVERED BRIDGE

Still very much  in use -- one lane only
Located in  Lane County Oregon.



25 comments:

  1. I love covered bridges. We don't have very many left in our state, but I am lucky to have two very close by where I live.

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    1. Janet -- It seems I remember many covered bridges in your state -- but those memories are from long ago. I imagine most of your covered bridges have been replaced with steel bridges. Nice that you have some to enjoy near you. -- barbara

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  2. Nice shot. There are still many covered bridges in Ohio; lovely to see.

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    1. Joanne -- There are many covered bridges here too. Not all of them are accessible to motorized vehicles. They all seem to be located in the far reaches of the countryside. It seems that each one has its own identity. thanks -- barbara

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  3. Oh how beautiful. Any idea how old it is?

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    1. Barbara -- Nelson covered bridge was built in 1928 which would make it 87 years old. Another 13 years brings it to 100. the bridge is well maintained so I am sure it will make its 100th birthday. thanks -- barbara

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  4. Ha. Who gets to choose, I wonder. Nice photo with the ridgeline above.

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    1. Birdman -- My feelings exactly -- I guess the first one to reach the bridge gets the right of way. When I was taking photos of this bridge a UPS truck came whizzing through the bridge -- Apparently one does not slow down when using the bridge. thanks -- barbara

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  5. Nice to see one still in use.

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    1. Michelle -- Yes, I rode it several times while out in the country taking photos. It was a fun experience. -- thanks barbara

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  6. Catching up on blog posts today. Looks like you're catching your stride exploring the backcountry in your area!

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    1. Melissa -- Backcountry abounds where I live now. Wish I had more time to explore more areas. Thanks -- barbara

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  7. I do love covered bridges, even the ones in nearby Madison county Iowa, though the novel about them was a bit trashy...:)

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    1. troutbirder -- I am always amazed to find so many standing and of those many, still being used by motorized vehicles. thanks -- barbara

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  8. I have a photograph of this in my bedroom, a friend who lives in Atlanta took it and framed it for me :0)
    I'm not finding time to look after my husband, more and more work, and update my blog, Barbara, so for a time I shall just update my website, vital to keep news of my books relevant, and the odd facebook and twitter comment. Hope to see you there from time to time :0) http://caroleannecarr.co.uk

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    1. Carole Ann -- Yes, you certainly do sound busy with everything. Keeping your website current does take time. Plus you do lots of public appearances. I will stop in ever so often to keep up with what you are doing. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  9. I'm always fascinated when I see these old covered bridges that you have. I think there is all of one in the whole of Norway, and I have never seen it. I think it was built by someone who had visited yhe USA - there was a story about it on Norwegian TV some time ago.

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    1. visualnorway -- I think that covered bridges became a fashion of sorts in the U.S, that is why there were so many at one time. Raw material, trees, were in abundance so entire bridges were built out of wood. They now have declined in numbers across our country and the federal government has instituted a program titled the Historic Covered Bridge Preservation Program. The program administers funding to preserve the bridges. What might have been the reason that your country has only one is they were removed for decaying reasons?? thanks -- barbara

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    2. Thank you for the background information. As far as I know, Norway has only ever had that one covered bridge. Stone masonry was the preferred way in the old days, and from time to time supplemented by some wood. But never covered.

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  10. At one point, years ago, I was going to cross-stitch a whole set of covered bridges to hang in my living room. That was in the 80s during my country decorating phase. I do still very much like seeing real covered bridges. Best wishes, Tammy

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    1. Tammy -- Oregon presently has 50 left out an original number of 450. Now most are protected through a federal program. In the U.S.-- and as you well know, covered bridges are a thing of beauty and folks want them to remain so. Your covered bridges set in cross-stich would make a beautiful wall. thanks -- barbara

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  11. My father in law did a painting of an Oregon covered bridge. One of my daughters has it.

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    1. Hattie -- what a nice family piece to have. I imagine your daughter enjoys it. Family pieces reflecting their culture are treasures. My daughter has a large oil painting done by her great-grandfather when he first arrived from Holland and set up a blacksmith shop in St Louis. He is standing near his shop with his wife and two of his children nearby. I saved the oil from the trash heap that the family had compiled to throw away with great-grandfather's things after he had passed. thanks -- barbara

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  12. Great part of Americana...I've only been across one, in Jackson, New Hampshire...I think there are quite a few in New Hampshire, but I don't know of any in Maine.

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    1. Rita -- It does seem that some states do not have as many as other states. For what reason I am not sure. Perhaps it a simple thing of states thinking it was not "fashionable" to keep them around????? -- thanks -- barbara

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