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Monday, November 10, 2014

COMMUNITY GARDENS -- CLOSING UP THE SEASON




This past summer I wrote a post on the Fulton organic community gardens that are located here in Portland. The post can be found here .  So this past Sunday I decided to wander through the many gardens again and observe how some of the organic gardeners were closing down their small individual plots for the coming winter in the Pacific Northwest. 

Above is a raised garden covered with burlap bags. Burlap is nice as it helps maintain the soil at an even temperature while letting moisture soak through into the soil bed.Weeds are minimal under this burlap blanket. 

Tomatoes rest just outside this raised bed -- apparently leftovers that the gardener had no use for. Probably the small critters that live around the gardens will be checking them out.




Sunday was quite cool and I was glad that I had worn my winter vest. It was late afternoon, overcast mostly, with the sun popping out occasionally.

The above sunflower silhouettes were about eight feet tall -- all aged with brown stalks and leaves. It was the end of the trail for them. But even with that being the case they stood regal against the sky.
  



These entwined bean vines had been picked over and left to show their beauty as they bared their gray branching. 




This gardener had cleared out her garden plot in preparation for next spring's plantings. The gardener had topped the bed with some additional peat and laid leaves upon it -- forming a nice cover to the soil below -- one alternative to burlap mulching.




More burlap used on a small plot.




This watering can was left hanging near a straw (or hay) mulched bed -- another fine alternative way to mulch a plot for the winter.

About five gardeners were out working in their gardens -- out of the hundred or so that had been planted. 

I have always felt that community gardening was a wonderful way to get to know other gardeners and to share knowledge. Plus the extra benefits of getting exercise, and to leave stress behind..

10 comments:

  1. As usual a interesting photos and a text that told me something I ( as a non-gardener) didn't know -- three ways to mulch in preparation for the winter. Thanks for a fine post.

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    1. June -- I was once a gardener and still am, only in my head. So I admire the beauty of creating gardens, growing them and getting them to bed for the winter. There is so much history to gardening. Like your quilts -- they have evolved over time adopting new ideas -- thanks barbara

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  2. We put the children's garden to bed yesterday. LOTS of work, but worth it.

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    1. Tabor -- Would be interesting to know about your children's garden. When I lived in Michigan, Michigan State University had a large site set aside that featured childrens gardens. I found it intriguing. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  3. I'm considering burlap. I never thought of that.
    And I'm still trying to get my camera fixed. It takes OK pix at this point but needs a new lens.

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    1. Hattie -- Coffeehouses usually have burlap bags leftover from their bulk coffee purchases. Otherwise I found it difficult to find unless you know some old farmers that still have some in their barns. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. Interesting though it reminds me of the fact that some of my fall cleanup remains undone now buried beneath the snow....:)

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    1. I'd say you have a beautiful snow cover for your area. I hear your temps have been below zero! Yikes. do you ever get used to the cold there. -- thanks -- barbara

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  5. Another lovely documentation of positive community activity, Barbara...

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    1. Rita --- When I lived in MI and was doing my after retirement subbing several of the schools had children's gardens. They were beautiful and no one bothered them. I thought how wonderful to teach an activity that was beneficial to the soul. -- barbara

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