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Wednesday, February 12, 2014

WHERE OLD CARS GO TO DIE


 Woodland Graveyard



Not a great sight! What do you think?

34 comments:

  1. Such cars make great subjects for photographers, but I admit that is the only good reason I find for just leaving them around like that. No recycling or anything?

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    1. RuneE -- Old cars seem to be toted off to machines that squeeze them into small bundles of metal -- from there I am not sure what happens to them. Tabor's comment below points out the Cuban economy that maintains its old cars in fine shape. I think this is a fine idea -- keep your car in shape -- drive it for many years. thanks -- barbara

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  2. The picture has the feel of having come upon something prehistoric which is quite a bit more romantic than it actually is. At times I've been walking in a woods and come upon junk, an old pick up or refrigerator or something like that and just shake my head that people would dump things like that and think about how the weeds an fallen leaves are trying to cover it up.

    Your header picture is very beautiful!

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    1. June -- Yes, it does have a prehistoric feel now that you mention it. It certainly is an eye stopper when one sees a dumped appliance in a lovely wooded area. I have noticed it can even happen in very pristine areas. Like your words about the weeds and leaves trying to cover it up. thanks for your comment -- barbara

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  3. Seems to me there is some way the valuable materials in these cars could be recycled. Not enough of a recession yet...Cuba has kept their old cars useful for decades.

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    1. Tabor -- Cuba has had to reinvent itself. I'm sure quite a challenge from the high swinging times of the former Cuban culture. I like what they have done with their cars -- keeping their bodies and mechanical parts in good shape. Here we are so worried that folks won't buy, buy, buy so we encourage buying to say we are improving our economy rather than saying we are ruining our environment. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. Not lovely. It reminds me of visiting my friend, on the edge of the Cherokee National Park. Beautiful mountains, trees and car carcasses.

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    1. Joanne -- People that dump like this should keep those items dumped on their property. As it is now they feel they are free to dump these carcasses anywhere but of course not on their own place. Wait, I have seen many carcasses on some owner's property. Dumped carcasses are a symptom of our mixed priorities in this country.

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  5. We have a neighbor a few miles away that has one of these. Why? I don't know. He has a field full of rusting down old vehicles. It's a blight!!!

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    1. Starr -- This particular photo above had hundreds of cars in the woods spread over many acres. I could only get a small part of them in my photo. This location was way into back country. What is the justification for these? Much like you, I really have no answer as to why these graveyards exist. thanks -- barbara

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  6. No, not a great sight. I noticed the trees first, then saw past them to the car wrecks. We are littering our world with discarded things.

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    1. claggle -- Agree -- I sometimes think that some day when we run out of natural resources we will need to go back and mine our landfills for resources. All the natural places will be gone. -- barbara

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  7. There are so many parameters going on with this particular situation. Not much can be said that works across the board wherever the old is found that has appeal.

    What can be said for sure is people are and will continue to do things like this. At least if "things that have appeal" are outside in a warmer drier climate they fare better. Massive amount of funds involved with these particular cars.

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    1. One Fly -- I have run across these graveyards in other states. Could it be that we live in a country that looks the other way so no solution will be found? Like Tabor said above -- check out Cuba's solution. Here is a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NQO9mOIYu8

      thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  8. Junk is junk and never pretty especially in rural areas where it runs the landscape. Fortunately they are disappearing in our area due to laws and improved attitudes about proper disposal....;)

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    1. troutbirder -- You are fortunate to have regulations that stop such landscapes to exist in your area. I'm sure all these old cars and trucks benefit the landowner's interest but how is my question. thanks -- barbara

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  9. Lots of these dump yards out in rural ME. Here about that sinkhole in KY that ate a bunch of Corvettes?

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    1. Hmm -- I would think that ME would have some regulations as they promote tourism heavily. A tourist sure doesn't want to view a sea of wrecked vehicles in some woods. thanks -- barbara

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  10. A car hoarder. They all need to be taken to the car crusher and recycled. Sadly that won't likely happen until the owner dies and his wife (am I wrong to assume it is a man?) or children are left to deal with it.

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    1. Birdie -- Maybe we should just have fewer cars. Limit the number of vehicles to a family??? I don't think that would work for sure. At least not yet. thanks -- barbara

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  11. Oh my! Is that someone's yard?! Yikes!

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    1. Melissa -- This photo was taken way out in the country where folks have acreage. This particular place had lots of woods that he tucked his wrecks into. Perhaps he thought no one would notice the mess deep in the woods? thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  12. Colorful, but not very pretty. He could have sold them for parts or gave them away. Someone who likes to tinker with cars could have taken them and fixed them up.

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    1. Janet -- I didn't count them but I believe there were over a hundred cars on this land. There was no commercial sign that said"Parts" or telling people to come take them free. I guess it was just their type of landscaping?? thanks -- barbara

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  13. Pretty trashy but also oddly fascinating subject for photography. Around ere, people used to just push their old junkers into the rivers or streams -- finally there was a concerted effort to clean up the ways.

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    1. Vicki -- I don't think I have seen a car pushed into a stream or river but I have seen appliances and of course lots of other smaller stuff. Tires seem to be one thing I find in the woods -- as if the person throwing them away thinks they will eventually compost into the soil! Great that you now have a clean up effort in your state. -- thanks -- barbara

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  14. Well, we make sure everyone has a car and that it is almost impossible to get anywhere without one, and we don't provide adequate recycling. Most junkers get shipped off the island here, and god knows where they end up, but there are still plenty of them rusting away in vacant lots and even in front yards. And there are more and more cars all the time.

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    1. For years there has been many good suggestions for providing transportation via local and long distance rail but of course we know that it has only happened in very few places. The gas and oil industry does not want us to replace our-over use of our cars. So they line the pockets of our politicians so they will vote against improved rail transportation. At one time we had wonderful connections between towns in our nations but now the rail cars only haul material goods -- ruling the use of the rails over Amtrak which plays second fiddle to them.
      Scary that they ship out your junkers -- hope they are not dumping them in the ocean! -- thanks -- barbara

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  15. I'm not sure I understand: does some one own this land & people pay him to accept their old vehicles? The amount of discarded junk in this country is unbelievable!

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    1. Rita -- good question that I cannot answer. This place being way out in the boonies didn't appear to me as an approachable home to ask. I travel alone and follow my instincts as to who I talk to and what places are best to just get a photo and leave -- at these places I usually shoot from my truck. thanks -- barbara

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  16. With the price of scrap metal to ship to China folks knock on our door wanting to pay us to take a few relic trucks we have in the field. They are not visible from the road so I ask, how do you know we have scrap? On the farm parts from these vehicles come in handy many times. We can always haul them or get some of those inquirers to make a few dollars should the need arise.

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    1. Grampy -- Interesting that they are knocking on doors to buy old trucks that you have. I imagine having a few relics on the farms are useful for parts. This person had acres of cars in the woods. It was a bad kind of amazing to view. -- thanks

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  17. I hate to admit it but I am drawn to the sight of vintage trucks rusting in the deep woods. It provokes a sense of abandonment and at the same time a sense of peace for me. But like anything else there is a point where excess becomes painful to see. It was interesting to read the responses.

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    1. Raining Iguanas -- As RunE comments above -- there is a certain draw for a camera to shoot these old relics. I think this was "excess" but of course I didn't stop to ask as the ambiance of the place gave me weird vibes. -- barbara

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